20+ years players: Obscure repertoire

Discussion in 'Orchestra / Solo / Chamber Music' started by Manny Laureano, Dec 8, 2004.

  1. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Gentle Sight-Readers (with apologies to Miss Manners),

    Jack D kicked off a thought in my mind about infrequently played repertoire by FAMOUS composers.

    I thought of pieces that and have played that turned out to be a bit of fun and also ones that I have never played after so long in the business. A few years ago I actually played "Aus Italien" by R. Strauss. There's a rather nice "Zarathustra-like" lick in the second movement. I have never, though, played his Symphony in F minor.

    I have also never played the second and third symphonies of Shostakovitch.

    My first season I played the "Manfred" symphony of Tchaikovsky but not since then.

    How about those of you that have been doing this 20+ years? Anything unusual by well-known composers?

    ML
     
  2. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    Stravinsky's "Happy Birthday" :lol:
    He also did an arrangement of the Star Spangled Banner!!

    Wilmer
     
  3. Johntpt

    Johntpt Pianissimo User

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    Feb 11, 2004
    Toluca, Mexico
    I haven't been at it 20 years yet, but I thought of a couple of things.

    This year we played Dvorak 5th and 6th Symphonies, both a lot of fun and are rather under-played when compared to the frequently heard 7, 8 & 9.

    Once we played an orchestration of Ravel's "Gaspard de la Nuit" by some other French composer, maybe Constant. Nice trumpet parts.

    JU
     
  4. James Smock

    James Smock New Friend

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    The Stravinsky Star Spangled Banner is great. Every year, I hope one of the orchestras I play in will use it. Alas, I've only played it once.

    "In The South" by Elgar seems to pretty under the radar. Great music.


    James
     
  5. mcnaughtan

    mcnaughtan New Friend

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    Coburg, Germany
    Paul Dukas' Symphony in C (?) - a really nice piece, and who ever played anything by him except L'Apprenti Sorcier?
    Incidentally, it is another of those rare pieces of the French school with a special D trumpet part; 1st and second are in C.
     
  6. JackD

    JackD Mezzo Forte User

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    Manchester / London
    By the way Manny, Rach 1 is fun! It's different to the other Rachmaninov symphonies / concertos I've heard - very brooding etc. Theres quite a reasonable amount to do for the principal.
     
  7. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Bravo! That's a good one... I have actually played the entire ballet score "La Peri" but don't recall much about it.

    There's a good Debusy tune that is rarely played called "The Marytrdom of Saint Sebastien". I've played that a couple of times and it's in the excerpt books. It's got one rather stirring solo in the middle of it.

    Keep it coming... some good thoughts here.

    ML
     
  8. Dennis Ferry

    Dennis Ferry New Friend

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    Feb 15, 2005
    Schubert's 1st Symphony

    Watch out for Schubert's 1st!

    Dennis Ferry
    Principal Trumpet
    Orchestre de la Suisse Romande
     
  9. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Dennis,

    Let me guess... I'll bet it's up in the upper register, where a person hearing "Schubert" night be thinking "Oh, V - I... big deal."

    Is that right? I've not played it.

    ML
     
  10. Dennis Ferry

    Dennis Ferry New Friend

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    Feb 15, 2005
    Schubert 1

    Exactly. You see it on a program and you figure, well, I don't have to take THAT part out. Schubert! Sheesh! Well, think any Mozart symphony in D and put the trumpet part up an octave. You have to use a pic for this. It is full of high D's (literally dozens) and they don't really blend in with what the rest of the orch. is doing. I've played it twice, I think. Sometimes the conductor will tell you ahead of time that certain high D's can and should be down an octave. Schubert was a kid when he wrote this and really didn't understand . . . He learned his lesson tho, all the rest of his works are a piece o' cake. Unless, of course, one is trying to be musical, in tune, and have a beautiful sound. Then, nothing is easy. But some things are easier than others!
     

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