30% Less

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by BrotherBACH, Aug 23, 2012.

  1. graysono

    graysono Mezzo Forte User

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    The ex-psychologist speaks: The only way to get over fear is repeated confrontation/exposure with the feared situation/object. (This can be done in imagination, too.) You get up on the stand and do it. You keep playing in front of the judges. There are notable exceptions: B Streisand apparently had stage fright throughout her career.
     
  2. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    Don't be offended, JNINWI, I'm sure you've got some good points, so I've just divided this post so I can read it.

    I've never heard of that hula hoop analogy, that's interesting. As i was reading it, I was thinking about myself. Actually, for me, acknowledging an audience depends on what stage of performance I'm in, I guess. I try to acknowledge them for communication's sake, but once the solo kicks in, I'm in my own space, but that's not so much a protective thing as it is a musical/psychological/spiritual thing. With this one exception. If I'm playing in a cover type band in a club, many times when I'm soloing, and certainly when I'm playing background, I'm surely looking into the crowd/dancers. It's too much part of the fun of being there.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2012
  3. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    If you are a professional psychologist, I'm not going to challenge your professional prescription, but (cough, cough) I will point out that doing the same thing over and over again, expecting different results, is also the street definition of insanity.

    Getting back on that stage, e.g. confronting your fright, is much better overcome not just by continued repetition, but by doing it with additional relaxation and coping skills that you've learned and developed over time. In my opinion. :D

    At any rate, I don't believe BrotherBACH is really talking about classic stage fright, which is what some of us are morphing this discussion into, but about something a bit more benign, just not playing up to our capabilities when we get together with friends, or maybe with our community bands (I'm a bit inconsistent in this regard), and the like.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2012
  4. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Agreed. From another ex-psychologist, systematic desensitization is where you need to head - try reading up on it- easy to do. Just keep performing in front of others- eventually it gets to be nothing to it. Now, if I could only get my lab from going crazy during storms. He has the Streisand syndrome.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2012
  5. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Great thread.

    I agree that many of us may suffer from the "30% less" rule, whether it's playing for your teacher, for an audition, of playing at a gig.

    I like kehaulani's "give-a-****" approach to learn how to play like something is at stake, with the hope of closing this "30%" gap. My son has been working on this with his trumpet teacher ... whether playing alone or in front of an audience, to always focus on what he is "trying to say".

    For me, I view it like the 3rd Commandment, to not refer to God in a meaningless (or vain) way. In the same way, I try to never play my trumpet in vain, whether alone or at a gig.

    Mike
     
  6. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Steve, I really have to take exception to both of you psychologists if you are meaning to say that all you have to do to overcome stage fright is to just keep getting up on stage. Desensitisation aside, surely you don't mean to ignore that there are other techniques that are also helpful, maybe necessary, to supplement that "getting back on the horse" process.

    I've been a performing professional for over thirty years and I'm pretty jaded, but there are still times when a case of the jitters can come out of nowhere - and which, ironically, can have little to do with the importance of the performance - and when I then need to turn to other techniques I've developed to get me relaxed and back in the zone. And just walking back onto the stage one more, out of thousands of times, will not take away the anxiety at that moment.
     
  7. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    I wonder if we're not talking about two separate things.

    There's learning to play with meaning every time you pick up the trumpet.

    There's also the stage fright issue.

    I think learning to play-with-purpose is different from desensitization, although they're both important issues.

    Mike
     
  8. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Trumpet MD has really nailed what I was discussing. I was just joking around with the other shrink. The case here doesn't sound like stage fright. However for those that have it, it can be devastating. In my early career I was probably the worse case you have ever seen. Whether speaking or playing, I was so severe that I would even throw PVc's and have arythmia. Doc finally put me on inderol and it was like night and day. That eventually let me desensitize to the situations. I now occasionally speak to thousands - no problems. Nothing said here to encourage anyone to pursue medication.
     
  9. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Thanks, Steve.

    Yes, the OP is not talking about stage fright, the thread took a detour.
     
  10. BachStrad1

    BachStrad1 Pianissimo User

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    I'm not a psychologist and I don't even play one on TV, but I think BrotherBACH is just getting ahead of himself in his lessons. He's letting his concentration be divided by having his teacher there. It's a distraction. I like the hula hoop thing. I'm often easily distracted....shiny objects, jangling keys, squirrel...what was I saying? Oh yeah, concentration. We practice to develop proficiency to the point where we can perform an action without a lot of concious effort. But if he's trying to impress his instructor, he's changing his mental dynamics, which changes his physical dynamics and oops! Concetrate on what is at hand just like in the practice room. Don't be so focused on the goal that you trip on the road. Take things one step at a time and finish one step before going on to the next. Simple to say, hard to put into practice, I know.
     

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