3rd Question for Mr. Laureano

Discussion in 'Orchestra / Solo / Chamber Music' started by orchtrpt, Oct 20, 2004.

  1. orchtrpt

    orchtrpt Pianissimo User

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    Mar 4, 2004
    Dear Manny,

    Thanks for your informative posts so far. As someone who plays 1st trpt in a major orchestra... Can you tell us a little bit of what you do to stay in shape for your job besides playing in the group.

    Do you have any favorite exercises or warm up routines....

    How have your playing / practice habits changed as you continue to play..

    I'll expand on this a bit futher later. I guess I just want to know what kinds of things you do as a trumpet player to stay in shape away from the group.
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    "I guess I just want to know what kinds of things you do as a trumpet player to stay in shape away from the group."

    Great question...I need time to really give a good answer that doesn't sound too esoteric...stay tuned.

    ML
     
  3. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    I don't have a set routine that I do everyday although there are literally a couple of exercises that I incorporate daily.

    I must say that my daily work begins with making sure that I'm set physically (toes pointed forward, head back over the spine, and a good breath before the first tone is played.

    I like starting out with few fat low Cs that match up with what I have in my head. No questions in my mind just pure statements of tone and resonance. I like feeling the horn vibrate in my hand a little in the low register.

    Widening arpeggios that go in both directions follow immediately and sink deeper into the low register going for as much resonance as possible.

    I like crawling around the low, mid, and upper register chromatically and ascend relatively quickly to a high C and back down and up again.


    Perhaps a Clarke study will follow, perhaps a Gornston velocity study.

    After a few minutes ( 2 or 3 at most) I'll do a tonguing study from Goldman. Then another. I follow that with some sort of lip slurs that take me up to a high D, perhaps.(Arbans p.44)

    Break for 10 minutes. Total elapsed time incuding little breaks about 30 minutes.

    I'll continue with more tomorrow. It's been a long day and I'm a little fried.

    ML
     
  4. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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    Nov 2, 2003
    Not to hijack your thread, but could we expand this to include some of the other pros such as Wilmer Wise?
     
  5. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    Manny's life is organized, whereas my life is chaotic.
    Sometimes there is no time for a warmup. Over the years I have developed a very quick one. Like Manny, I try to be in tune with the trumpet in my head. I do a few Clarke things, a couple scales and I am ready to go.
    Before I leave the house I check my case for horns, yes I have shown up for the gig with an empty case or the wrong horn for the job. C.R.S........
    I check the bag for mutes and mouthpieces and valve oil
    Life can be crazy here in NYC :lol:
    Wilmer
     
  6. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    To continue:

    Articulation is an important issue for me. I feel that being able to tongue cleanly in all registers, especially the upper register, is a good litmus test for how well you control what comes out of the instrument. If you can play Pulcinella and play the high Cs with as nice a sound as your middle register, if you can play the squirrelly lick in the Bartok Concerto for orchestra on C trumpet with freedom, if you can play any of the many licks we have to play in the upper register cleanly and loudly when neccessary, then you're probably in good shape to play principal in a major orchestra.

    So, the point is to attend to things like page 148 in the Arban's book. 125 is crucial to being successful. The double and triple tonguing are huge. It sounds so obvious but it's so easy to get away from as a result of the daily tasks on the job. There really is no other way.

    Then I love to pull out solos that let me sing like the old Medez solos and the Dokshitzer arrangements of Fritz Kreisler tunes. Rustiques is a good one. Piccolo playing, I have found is essential to being successful. You have to grab an Arban's book and see how well you can play those studies on the piccolo. The Arban exercises don't go above a high A for the most part and we need to play that A in the Brandenburg, don't we? Well, there you go.

    You have to develop a great work ethic to get a good gig and then you have to maintain the ethic to keep the job, which is more important than getting it.

    Glad I wrote this early in the day....sounds like I have a lot of work to do. Yikes!

    ML
     
  7. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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    Nov 2, 2003
    Manny,

    Do you do the piccolo stuff as written but 8va and do you use A piccolo or Bflat? and how do you feel about mouthpiece buzzing? does having a horn with your an intergal mouthpiece change you ideas about mouthpiece buzzing? :wink:


    thanks.

    jason
     
  8. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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    Nov 2, 2003
    wilmer,

    what do you do for practice on days when you dont have gigs ? is your warmup the same? what kind of other practice do you do?

    thanks,
    jason
     
  9. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    "Do you do the piccolo stuff as written but 8va and do you use A piccolo or Bflat? and how do you feel about mouthpiece buzzing? does having a horn with your an intergal mouthpiece change you ideas about mouthpiece buzzing? :wink:"

    Jason,

    Yes, I play the etudes as written on the Bb piccolo. Mind you, I don't do a lot of this but I find the challenge an important one.

    Mouthpiece buzzing is a great tool for refining the ear and expressive playing. I don't favor mouthpiece buzzing in a clinical setting as a general rule except in limited circumstances. That is, endless long tones with no attention to anything other than making your lip feel warm. I hate that!

    I believe in what Arnold Jacobs used to advocate: play melodies, simple melodies and spur the part of the brain that wants to create a beautiful sound not the part that wants to observe. Let the audience do that. When buzzing, make statements, thoughtful statements.

    You're right...I had to have a separate mouthpiece for mouthpiece buzzing long ago when I played the Raja! Funny...

    Interestingly, I don't buzz much a all these days. Just don't feel the need except when I'm teaching someone who needs to learn to buzz properly. Maybe at the start of the season but not so much during it.

    ML
     
  10. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    Dec 30, 2003
    Monroe Ct.
    Hi Manny,

    I am curious, why did you give up the Raja?
     

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