7 in 7

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Alex_C, Oct 8, 2010.

  1. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
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    I hope others that have a problem with endurance read your words and understand that 7 in 7 is a real butt kicker of an exercise and eventhough it's hard as heck, it's worth it. If they hang in there and honestly do the exercises, they'll get significantly better in a season (or sooner).
     
  2. DanoTman

    DanoTman New Friend

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    Oct 13, 2010
    This is the core concept to my new course, "16 Weeks to Killer Chops". Check it out at - Home and give me some feedback.
     
  3. SCV81

    SCV81 Pianissimo User

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    Sep 10, 2010
    Bay Area, Northern Calif.
    I love this exercise. The ease of reaching the upper range with minimal effort is truly astounding. Wish I knew this and proper embouchure during my teenage years.

    How long do I hold each note. Do I go up then down in one breath?
     
  4. Alex_C

    Alex_C Piano User

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    May 30, 2010
    Gilroy, California
    Danno from what I can see your course looks like a good one. I think in a lot of cases it's a matter of having a course where you're told what to do each day, each practice session, so it's just like working through a math book, some of us need that kind of guidance.

    SCV81 - I think we may be neighbors! Where in the Bay Area are you? Anyway, as long as the basic premise of the exercise is satisfied, I think we can mix it up, slow, then fast, etc.
     
  5. SCV81

    SCV81 Pianissimo User

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    Sep 10, 2010
    Bay Area, Northern Calif.
    @Alex_C - I'm in Hayward at the moment
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2010
  6. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
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    If you are in reference to 7 in 7, I recommend doing them in quarter or 8th notes. Go up and down taking as few breaths as possible for the minute.
     
  7. SCV81

    SCV81 Pianissimo User

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    Sep 10, 2010
    Bay Area, Northern Calif.
    @Markie - quarter or 8th notes, got it, thank you! :)
     
  8. leftmid7

    leftmid7 Mezzo Piano User

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    Sep 21, 2010
    Franklin, TN
    what I found that works just as well(maybe you could alternate for boredom's sake), is start on mid staff G and play whole note, whole note, two whole notes(tied), whole rest(but keep your lips tightened as if you were still playing. notice I didn't say pressure, just embouchure locked in place).

    Then go chromatically upward playing this same combination on each note til you get to the point where your tone goes to air because you simply can't hold it longer. Don't stop when it goes to air, play through til the end of the phrase even with the whole rest.

    This effectively shreds your lips like doing crunches and then holding them shreds your abs. It is amazing. I did it for lead in big band. I'm a strong but not a very high player by nature but this routine helped me get consistent lead volume Double Es and even up to some Double Gs when needed.
     
  9. SCV81

    SCV81 Pianissimo User

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    Sep 10, 2010
    Bay Area, Northern Calif.
    @leftmid7 - thank you! Looks like another great exercise. Something noticeable about range exercises is the 'climbing' to the next higher note rather than trying to hit it out of the blue. Many moons ago, in band and drum corps , I was satisfied with playing 3rd trumpet/soprano just priding myself on my gorgeous tone, hehe. But now, thirty years later, I'm hitting high C with NO effort! thanks again :)
     
  10. fraserhutch

    fraserhutch Mezzo Piano User

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    Jan 23, 2004
    Novato, CA, USA
    SCV1 - good observation. All of the range extending methods I am aware always extend your range by approaching the upper notes from the lower ones.

    The Frank Minear method uses mf octave glisses up.
    The Claude Gordon Method uses arpeggios.
    The Bob Odneal Casual Double C Method uses soft scales and diminished arpeggios.
    and so one. The vast majority use some for of arpeggios.

    Once the basic note is achieved, though, you need to be able to own it. Some of these methods go on to achieve that by including exercises that force you to learn how to hit those notes out of the blue. Claude Gordon's method has some range extension exercises where you start at the top note. The Colin Advanced Lip Flexibilities text has an exercise at the end of each section that has octave leaps to the top tone.
     

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