A couple of things for the high register.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by dbacon, May 30, 2004.

  1. dbacon

    dbacon Mezzo Piano User

    576
    5
    Oct 24, 2003
    Scottsdale, AZ.
    Two things have to happen to play in the high register-

    1. The embouchure must have your lips in a position to vibrate fast and free.

    2. The fuel to the embouchure (air) must be energized (air velocity) to get the lips vibrating. Think of the lips as energy resisters.


    So the chops can vibrate, develop the embouchure muscles through isometric training. This allows you to use less pressure, the lips vibrate better, more freely. Make sure you have the highest lip efficiency. Mouthpiece placement over the pressure point, and be sure to place outside the red of the lip (inner and outer rim!). Pressure on the firmer stuff outside the red. To produce much faster vibrations you increase air velocity (not volume) and power. Do breathing exercises (that you Bobby Shew). Through the sound, make sure tongue position is correct. Do Flexibility exercises, pivot exercises, allow the tongue to find it's position for the upper register. The sound tells you when it's right. The aperture must become smaller for the high register. Flex and range studies making sure not to blast out the high notes so your aperture will learn how to get smaller. Forcing the high register frezzes the lip motionless, it can't change size. Do isometric exercises for more embouchure strength and aperture control. Make sure you are not in a more puckered position, or a more pinched position. Both "MM" in the lips and "OO" at the corners are needed to control aperture size and keep it's shape.


    The Double High range needs coordination, finese, skill. Not strength! This is an area for "Strength is my enemy, weekness is my friend."
    If you try playing in this range with more force you will fight the pipe. To play up there you are using more finese and control, and once you get it down you can usually do it all night becuase it's not such physical effort.


    Try it.
     
  2. SchilkeFan

    SchilkeFan New Friend

    17
    0
    Nov 27, 2003
    Dave,

    Your method is sound, but in order to sell I think that it'll need a catchy name...something like: Pork Chops, by Dave "bringin' home the" Bacon.

    That should give'em something that they can really sink their teeth into!

    John MacGregor
    Waukesha, WI
     
  3. dbacon

    dbacon Mezzo Piano User

    576
    5
    Oct 24, 2003
    Scottsdale, AZ.
    John,

    Hey I have no method and none of this is original with me. All from Uan Rasey and Bob Findley, some George Graham and Mark Van Cleave. Some others I can't recall. Anything good came from else where.

    How's the cheese up in your country? Miss Leinenkugel's Beer, I taught up in Wisconsin years ago.
     
  4. dbacon

    dbacon Mezzo Piano User

    576
    5
    Oct 24, 2003
    Scottsdale, AZ.
    This is such a fine post from the Herald, I thought it needed to go in here.
    From "tradjazzman."

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Well isn't America great. We can post "our" opinion with no problems.

    So with that said here goes>>>

    I don't care how much we practise, who our teachers are, what MPC we use, or what high note method books we practise out of............... we all are different and have different limitations. Some folks will NEVER play double C's and I don't care how much they practise. Now I"m not saying we can't improve our range, I'm sure we ALL can. But for some the sky is the limit, for others it could drive us crazy or away from the horn if we think the reason we can't do it is because we don't work hard enough.

    Just as not all singers will have the same range. We are all different. Our teeth are different, as well as our chops, lips, etc, etc. Natrually some people are set up to be able to soar above the rest. Some of us don't have that set up. I mean if every trpt player that didn't have the perfect teeth, etc, and played off center, etc etc.... had to quit because he couldn't be the utimate lead man well........... then that is sad. If we look at it as if we are not working hard enough, and that is why we can't do it, it could drive some of us away from the horn.

    I remember a time I was going to quit because no matter how hard I practised I just couldn't play real high above high C. Heck that was 30 years ago and I would have PAID for just a high D. Then I started to realize that hey maybe I should start working on jazz improv, etc. You know sometimes a good jazz chair player is as hard to find as the utimate lead man. And a good jazz man with a strong D-E-F (that he can use) is also cool. Anyhow over the years I have worked my range up to around a F, and I am very happy. It is strong, and clear and I get work. But no matter what I play, how long I practise I'll never play like Maynard. And guess what...........Im ok with that. I didn't give up, I just realized that is life and I worked on other aspects of my horn/ playing.


    The good news "We don't all have to play double C's to be great trpt players". Alot of great music to be played below high C. Keep working on that high range and it will improve, and get stronger. But don't beat yourself up if you can't blow double C's......... we are ALL not set up for that. For those of you that are be sure to say "thanks" once in awhile.

    Just my 2 cents.

    Ben
     
  5. SchilkeFan

    SchilkeFan New Friend

    17
    0
    Nov 27, 2003

    Hey Dave,

    The cheese and beer are just fine up here in America's Dairyland. Leinenkugel's puts out a variety of great beer products, and my personal favorite is Leinie's Red. Nothing better than enjoying some Leinie's while walking from stage to stage at Summerfest.

    I certainly hope that summer gets here soon, and all this rain that we've been getting moves elsewhere!

    Later,

    John MacGregor
    Waukesha, WI
     
  6. Uncle Albert

    Uncle Albert New Friend

    21
    0
    Nov 12, 2003
    US
    YOU LOST ME ON THE PIVOT AND ISOMETRIC EXERCIZES MIGHT BE.

    CAN YOU POINT TO SOME EXPLANATION OF WHAT IS INVOLVED?
     
  7. pops

    pops Pianissimo User

    70
    8
    Mar 17, 2004
    Dallas
    A pivot is simply keeping the airstream lined up in the center of the mouthpiece cup. (Come on I know but I'm keeping it simple OK.)

    This is done by advanced players with the tongue (I haven't pivoted in 20 years.)

    But at first Reinhardt taught you to move the bell slightly. This changed the angle between the mpc and the lips and helped the airstream even out.

    Most people move the bell up slightly when going lower like middle c to Low G.
    And they will lower the bell slightly when playing higher.

    Some people because of an underbite, abnormal lip size, or mpc placement way off from 50-50-, 1/3-2/3, or 2/3-1/3 will need to pivot the bell the other direction.

    The sound is suddenly better.
     
  8. dbacon

    dbacon Mezzo Piano User

    576
    5
    Oct 24, 2003
    Scottsdale, AZ.
    Something else the pivot does, it keeps you in contact with your lower jaw. Get the pressure off your upper lip.
     
  9. dauminator3

    dauminator3 Pianissimo User

    How about some concepts and examples of isometric training...

    Just trying to improve--Jared
     
  10. dbacon

    dbacon Mezzo Piano User

    576
    5
    Oct 24, 2003
    Scottsdale, AZ.

    Long tones, lip slurs, scales practiced without removing the mouthpiece for the usual rests. Not Caruso, that's for timing and co-ordination. Isometricts develop a certain amount of embouchure strength. Practice Irons 7 without removing the mouthpiece and breathe through the nose. Less pressure/more in the mouthpiece. Don't let the chops spread. Very soft with the best sound you can play with, hear the clicks between the notes. Do five or so minutes of this, stress the corners some. No forcing, let the air do the work. Long tones the same way, just don't overdo any of this. Some will help, too much will tear you down. Feel the embouchure come towards the center like a camera lens. Push forward with the air, pucker with the chops, tongue position (listen, use the sound to tell you what's going on), less pressure.

    Ten minuets of this at the end of the day, warm-down, warm-up well the next day.....good stuff.
     

Share This Page