A few questions on range.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by GlassMen91, Jan 11, 2009.

  1. GlassMen91

    GlassMen91 New Friend

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    I was just wondering. At what point does being able to hit the really high notes not really matter anymore? I mean there are players that can hit double C's and higher but is there really a point? Will notes that high appear frequently in music? I'm about to enter college and I haven't found anything higher than a high C in my music.
     
  2. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Hi Glassmen,
    Markie here, It sounds like you can't play in the upper register very well. Develop your range and then get back with me. Oh yeah, "At what point does being able to hit the really high notes not really matter anymore"? It always really matters. Now get to work!!!
     
  3. GlassMen91

    GlassMen91 New Friend

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    Uhm, I can play in the upper register. I was just wondering whats the point of it? Is there any music that actually needs a double C?
    Btw, I honestly don't see how you can evaluate my level of skill through a post on a message board.

    What I'm trying to ask/say here is that it seems people just play high notes just so they can say, "I can hit F over Double C" Sure they can do it but does it really appear in music and when they play it, it can hardly be described as musical.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2009
  4. habitatchad

    habitatchad Pianissimo User

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    It depends on the type of music, who arranged it, and the group playing it. In jazz you will routinely find some very high notes written. In the two jazz bands I have been in I have seen the g above high c many times. I am currently playing in a church orchestra and the lead trumpet parts have d's, e's, and f's all through them. The only advice I can offer is to listen to some recordings of Stan Kenton, Buddy Rich, John Faddis, Maynard Ferguson, Arturo Sandoval, and the list could go on and on for how high register lead playing should be done. But don't rush it, I have known many players that could hit just about any note you could write, but they were not technically sound (poor tone, sloppy articulation, missing alot of notes......)
     
  5. oohhh yeah

    oohhh yeah Pianissimo User

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    Nov 23, 2008
    B.C. Canada
    Is the high notes above high C necessary?? NO. But if you can hit those very high notes, then good for you, because you have something to brag about. As long as you can play with a good tone, then you're set for life.
     
  6. Pakatak

    Pakatak New Friend

    Markie, no matter what genre of music you're in, an A over quadruple C will still sound like junk if you don't have a good sound and good technical skill. Range does matter, but it is nowhere near as important as you seem to have implied.

    My general rule of thumb is that if you can hit a high G (one octave above the G on top of the staff), you really don't need any more range in order to play most gigs that you'll get. However, I'm just a lowly high school trumpet player with no idea what commercial music looks like (G over DHC would be my guess for that genre), but for the majority of jazz and band/orchestral work, you shouldn't need much more than a G.
     
  7. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

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    Do a search on "money notes."

    Most notes above the staff are not music. If you feel the need to play in the high range go to Florida State University and study with Bryan Goff. He will teach you how to play the natural trumpet. Look up Nicklas Eklund.
     
  8. progmac

    progmac Pianissimo User

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    Jan 9, 2009
    It just depends. Listeners of classical music would say too much playing above the staff will quickly ruin a beautiful piece of music. Jazz listeners might disagree.

    From a playing perspective, we always want to increase our range. If you can play a d above high c, it makes you more confident with the b or a below high c, which you'll play a lot more of. So maybe a reliable high c means being able to play a higher g even if you never do.

    Again from a listener's perspective, the really moving trumpet or cornet pieces I've heard have rarely had a note above high c.
     
  9. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Dude, you're hangin' with the wrong crowd. Who gives a rat's ass what they can do? What's important here is once you're able to play the upper register in a musical way, you can answer your own question. "Does it really matter."
    Heck, this is the internet for pete's sake. Half the people will say it makes a difference and half will say it doesn't. While this type of info is good for statistics class, it won't answer your question. Only you can answer this question.
    Listen to Cat, Maynard, Doc, Miyshiro, Sandoval, Mendez, and get back to me. If you don't "get it" after seriously checking out the above listings, Ouch!!!!. However, the listing will get your ears in shape for what it suppose to sound like.
    Look up how Maynard, Mendez, or Pops Clinton recommends how to achieve a better range. Now, quit posting and get to practicing. In order to play in the upper range you need to not suck in the lower range. GET BUSY !!!!
     
  10. Bloomin Untidy Musician

    Bloomin Untidy Musician Piano User

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    Jan 14, 2008
    Staffordshire
    Look Markie, i will not have a "rat's ass" used in such derogatory terms. I have a sensitive pet rat who would be outraged if he knew that you had issue with his bottom. If you were more knowledgeable of rats' feelings, you would know to call it a Rat's booty!

    Cheers

    B.U.M.
     

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