A final thought for 2011

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by GregMTM, Dec 30, 2011.

  1. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Yeah, there was a creek running through my Grandparent's farm, and yes the heat was fierce, but it was the ache of about every muscle in my body at the end of the work day that was then my concern. I was then so dragged out, I was just lucky I could take my shoes off and wade through the shallow of the creek to supper. At least on such days I was excused from the evening milking chore. Too, that's when they turned on the gas heat of the water tank, (to clean the milk pails etc.) thereby with a hot soaking bath before bed, I didn't stink the bed linen with my BO or the horse liniment.

    Now what really ticks me off is that, what I then manually labored at, it is all mechanized now.
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Just ain't got a cast iron stomach to drink "boilermakers"! Made me sick also.
     
  3. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Yet, I am old enough to remember milking with the old "surge bucket milker" -- then dumping that into "milk cans" and transferring it to the bigger bulk cooling tank in the milkhouse. Yet, I am young enough to see the introduction of the vacuum pipeline that automatically took the milk to the milk house avoiding the lugging of the milk can ------but mostly my Dad and Uncle were into Pig farming --- which most things considered --- I always wanted to practice my trumpet as a "relief" and escape from the daily chores in life. and back then -----------I guessed we just played the trumpet, and didn't spend much time analyzing, flow, and tension, and air pressure, and sound waves, etc -----------much simpler times in those days -----no such thoughts as standing waves, and sound waves hitting our ear drums
     
  4. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Back then we hand milked into pails, and poured these into the cans as were taken to the cold milk house where they were held overnight and added to in the morning milking, then hauled down to the roadside platform for the truck to pick up later in the morning.
    The truck dropped replacement cans off to us which we again cleaned before using. When the regulations changed for us to have a cold tank, Grandpa sold all his cows and raised steers instead that earned more money. Too, he raised pigs at least enough for Grandma to prepare sides of bacon and hams to cure or smoke and sell directly to neighbors that didn't raise their own. Too, she was in charge of all the chickens and the eggs.

    I was living in the DC area selling all those milk cans as were a fad for a while at prices over $100 each.

    Too, I'd often sit on the dive rock above the creek after milking and play my trumpet Such was about 1,000 yards from the house and around the bend of the hillside. Mostly just my chromatic scales and songs that I had then memorized as there wasn't any light. Afterward, more that once I shed my clothes and skinny dipped in the creek.
     
  5. GregMTM

    GregMTM New Friend

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    I once tried to play a guitar with strings that had no tension, IT FAILED! (According to popular opinion and modern tastes in sound!!!)
    I once hit a drum with a skin that had no tension, AGAIN IT FAILED!!! (No pressure pulses hitting these eardrums baby!)
    I once played a trumpet...

    ...My mistake, I read the heading as "Anything TRUMPET related that isn't covered in another forum can be discussed here"!

    I know?! Hilarious!!!:roll:

    I can't simply just "hear it and play it", the trumpet beast didn't seem to do what I wanted it to. I have found that the physical singing approach to "relaxing" the body and finding that nice "flow" of air to reduce over-blowing is a great way to experiment with the elasticy of the lip tissue and the "required" tension at the sides of the aperture. Try it out, it's a beauty!

    Now, back to the milking!!!;-)
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I like the formula just the way it is. That being said, we don't learn to play trumpet over the internet. We need to flow and tension ourselves. That could be where some are having issues..............

    Greg, thanks for being here and offering help from the front line!
     
  7. vern

    vern Piano User

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    greg thanks for your comments vern
     
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Now - we got lip tension to produce a sound -- but I am certain that it is air flow that is the master of the sound. A thicker lip tissue needs to vibrate -- and if there is too much tension you inhibit the free vibration of said lip (in my opinion) - now if the aperture is "roundish" then there is tension equally around the aperture -- like a snare drum --- except the aperture needs to move a little bit for "air flow" to produce different timbre's of sound, and also different volumes. and that relates to milking a cow ----------because there has to be the right amount of tension on the udder to be able to get milk out of Her, and even pressure on the udder allows the mile to flow through the opening to produce and even stream of milk. Unfortunately some of us misunderstood that many people on TM have never milked a cow, let alone understand the mechanics of milking ---- rest assured Greg, that Air Flow, and Tension are mainstays of a lot of different mechanical systems --- and not just sound. I hope you enjoy the educatory responses on this general forum -- sorry if you thought we got off track ROFL ROFL ROFL
     

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