a little help please

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpettom, Sep 25, 2008.

  1. trumpettom

    trumpettom New Friend

    3
    0
    Sep 25, 2008
    Hi guys, i was wondering if i could get a little help here and advice here.

    Last week i was suddenly moved up into the orchestra section at my local music society, having only been in the top wind band for a week, and i've been given a piece to learn which is written in E. I'm sat here trying to work out what i will be playing, but i'm rather unsure :/. Is it the case that i just transpose up 6 semi-tones, which would make the key signature F# from C? or should i just not worry about that and move all the notes up 6 semitones. :shock:

    obviously this is my first time moved up there so any advice on what differs from a wind band would also be appreciated.

    also wondering why the music publishers can't just print it all transposed for you, would be alot easier!
     
  2. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

    1,529
    17
    Jul 26, 2008
    Not sure what the difference between these two are:

     
  3. trumpettom

    trumpettom New Friend

    3
    0
    Sep 25, 2008
    reading that back, i realise it is the same thing, however, i am supposed to transpose it up 6 semi-tones right? because i got that off an internet chart and i'm not sure if its right, as it also showd transposing it down 6 semi-tones was viable as well. But convention is to transpose it up right?

    Please help, i got rehersal tomorrow so really need to write down the notes.
     
  4. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

    1,529
    17
    Jul 26, 2008
    OK. I get it!

    UP must be right, if the C you transpose up from is the one BELOW the E.
     
  5. BrassOnLine

    BrassOnLine Piano User

    Age:
    41
    309
    2
    Nov 22, 2007
    Spain
    Bordogni's transposition method is a must in the USA... There are lots of threads on this matter...
     
  6. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

    3,865
    924
    Nov 16, 2005
    Vidin, Bulgaria
    I know of three types of transposing technique/conception:

    1. Interval transposing - just transpose every single note in the required interval, which in your case is diminished 5th or augmented 4th

    2. Key transposing - put your in the required key. In your case, you will play in F#major instead of C major. Think key, not interval.

    3. Clef transposing - imagine that you have another clef. I use this sometimes for 3rd transposition, never used it for 4th or augmented forth...use your brain. Imagine the required clef (if you master it) and add the necessary flats or sharp (key signature)

    As it seems that this is not a late minute gig for you, you may want to put down on paper your transposition. This will help both to develop your transposing skills and make a good gig even if transposing is still a novelty for you. My 2 cents. Hope it helps.
     
  7. trumpettom

    trumpettom New Friend

    3
    0
    Sep 25, 2008
    i did do a thread search to look for help, but the result was inconclusive, would you care to point me in the direction?

    Anyways, it looks like trumpet nick has come up trumps, so thank you :D

    i kind of got it from my grade 5 theory (i'm only 17 so not that great), but, as i sat that a couple of years ago i've forgotten most of it, so thanks for your help.

    btw, is this a US site? i didn't realise :oops: is there an english variant or is it a just general for english speaking?
     
  8. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

    1,529
    17
    Jul 26, 2008
    WERY nice summarizing, trumpetnick!
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,611
    7,955
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    If you are transposing an E trumpet part for a Bb player, you in fact will have a part in F# and move each note up 6 semitones.

    The reason that the music is not transposed is because there is no need to. Symphonic players learn the tools of the trade and sound and transposition are two VERY important ones!!!!!!!

    Congratulations on the advance. You must be doing something VERY right for them to express this confidence! We look forward to future success posts!

    Robin
     

Share This Page