A quieter way to practice...

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Kyrk, Oct 1, 2010.

  1. SFPat

    SFPat Pianissimo User

    117
    9
    Sep 20, 2009
    Houston
    I use a Brass Spa practice mute and love it. A little bit of resistance but as mentioned by others, helps with the endurance.
     
  2. ottoa57

    ottoa57 Pianissimo User

    214
    4
    Feb 15, 2010
    Macomb, Mi
    I really agree with all the comments in this thread...very good advise...my thoughts and agreements are; one of my teachers Bob McCoy in NYC, had me warm up on a cup mute...and yes, after you take the mute out, playing w/o is somewhat easier. What I am going to add to this thought is, there are better mutes out there, than practicing with a cup, or harmon mute. I have a Denis Wick practice mute, that was designed about 20-25 years ago. It is very good, Although by todays' recent designs,,,more resistive. I am in the market for a new practice mute. I see many companies now have one. If possible, ordering 3-4 my mail would be ldeal..try them, send back the ones you dont like. I do not work for Dillon's Music in NJ...but they do have very good service and a very big selection of practice mutes. I am going to order the Brass Spa practice mute...and Dillon's own model. MY point through all this is...getting the benefits of playing with a mute..that I agree with with, WITH less resistance than is possible with standard mutes,,,( although there is a place and reason for practicing with those too!) I feel the newer practice mutes mentioned, are quieter, less resistive, more in tune. Again, Dark Knight and the others are right there with very good advice. This is my contribution to the discussion. One more thought...The Best Brass and the Dillon mute are very small and fits right inside the bell....the design of these 2 particular mutes allows you to hear better too. This is why I am saying practice mute design has come a long way since the first ones that came out. Take care.
     
  3. glorybe

    glorybe Piano User

    279
    19
    Jul 29, 2009
    Usually you can make noise in daylight hours and up to a certain time at night without police bothering you unless you get more radical than you could get with a trumpet. For example if I am using a chain saw or a router at 7:30 PM I can't get in trouble even if it disturbs neighbors. I live in a condo and among other things I have trumpets, cornets, a valve trombone and a baritone horn. Lately I have been on the baritone horn from 2 to 4 hours per day and the only thing any neighbor has said is thanks for the wonderful music. I did go around and ask each of them if my playing was bothering them or if a certain time of day offended anyone. It did not.
     
  4. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

    1,094
    329
    Nov 16, 2009
    Near Portland, OR.
    My own experience has been similar to glorybe's.
     
  5. Alex_C

    Alex_C Piano User

    449
    6
    May 30, 2010
    Gilroy, California
    If I stand outside my door there's a rather good tuba player tooting away right now.
     
  6. jim trpt1

    jim trpt1 Pianissimo User

    62
    3
    Aug 7, 2010
    greensboro nc
    Yamaha silent brass is the way to fly, at least for a warmup. I use mine all the time, but it will wear you out a lot quicker. Either that or get better neighbors, mine aren't complaining.
     
  7. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

    857
    46
    Jul 14, 2010
    I have played drums in an apartment for years right downtown. I have never had a police visit.

    Here are some tips.

    1) Be aware that someone is always potentially listening(the world is your stage).
    2) Introduce yourself to your neighbors, ask them about when and where they work.
    3) Play when they aren't there the worst scenario is if you play at the same time each day, and that happens to be the time they are trying to watch a movie or something. If they happen to hear you on weekends or on an odd off day its not so bad.

    Finally, playing trumpet quietly or with dynamics is difficult at first, but after a while you won't go back. The other day I was having a horrible practice session, then I realized I was playing too loud and I couldn't control my notes and it was making me tired to fast.
    I went back to it only quietly and my range and flexibility came back immediately.
     

Share This Page