A severe downsizing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by VetPsychWars, Sep 11, 2012.

  1. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Cool! I often wonder how much "matching" the horn manufacturers did between their horns and the mouthpieces they shipped with them back in the day. I'm guessing that at least some of that went on, and when your embouchure gets along with the mouthpiece that's original to the horn, good things can happen.
     
  2. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    The Dou-Cup sizing is kind of weird, Dale. There are four sizes, 88-B through 88-E. The 88-B is the largest, and the 88-E is the smallest. As you through the range, up to four parameters change: cup depth, cup diameter, backbore size, and throat size. So, when you get bigger, everything gets bigger!

    And of course not every horn is alike, if you settle on one piece, it won't necessarily be the best piece for that horn. Couple that with the fact that they changed the design of these things at least four times that I can identify... it'll drive you batty. :-) But at least I have something that matches me to the Lightweight 400, whew.

    Tom
     
  3. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Had a trombone colleague in Germany who always played whatever mouthpiece came stock with the horn. He said they were all made to work that way, so why bother on a safari?

    Problem is, we have, uh, well, two of them:

    Mouthpiece makers can match the player to the mouthpiece to the horn, which might be perfect for big-name player one, but not for big-time player two. Second is, that some of us switch horns frequently and often in a concert we don't have the luxury to acclimate ourselves for even a few seconds to a different mouthpiece.

    The idea of using the mouthpiece built for the horn is a sound one, though.
     
  4. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    Years back - at least 10 - I remember reading something that Jeanne Pocius wrote concerning horns and mouthpieces. It was her teacher, Mel Broiles I believe, who told her that if you use different mouthpieces on different horns, you absolutely must be the master of all of them meaning that you practice them until you can pick up any of them at any time with 100% confidence you will get the job done. She mentioned lining them up on a table, grabbing each one and being absolutely dead on with your sound.
    I also take this to also infer there is no adjusting to the horn/mouthpiece for "a couple of bars" until you are comfortable.
    Every knowledgeable player, mouthpiece manufacturer, and horn manufacturer will tell you three things must match. The player, mouthpiece, and horn.
    Whatever you use in a particular horn or situation, you darn well better be able to play it as well as you can play it.
    Rich T
     
  5. graysono

    graysono Mezzo Forte User

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    OMG: What if the plating changes everything?
     
  6. nieuwguyski

    nieuwguyski Forte User

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    This is an ideal to which we can all aspire, but there's a world of difference between being principal trumpet in the New York Metropolitan Opera orchestra and playing in an amateur community band. Again, we should all strive to do our best, but a community-band player likely won't lose their chair if it takes them a bar or two to settle in on a new mouthpiece.
     
  7. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    Charlie Melk is doing the prep work. He's forgotten more about using a buffer than most people ever learn. If it does change at all, it will be so tiny that I will adapt to it in like a day.

    Anyone who tells you their piece plays completely different after plating is confused.

    Tom
     
  8. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    The only issue I see with community band players doing this is they can and do mess up the ensemble. I've seen it happen in concert. It certainly isn't the end of the world, but why do they need to do it in the first place?
    I play in one (principal chair) in a community band and the only player who does that is the guy next to me and he can easily do it. Another truly superb community band I am in is one by invitation only. It consists of very talented "amateurs" and professionals. I share principal with one of the founders of the Synergy Brass Ensemble. We all switch instruments when needed and there is zero issue. If there is, we would be asked to leave the band.
    It's all a matter of perspective, I suppose.
    Rich T.
     

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