a very quick question

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by bigaggietrumpet, Feb 16, 2005.

  1. bigaggietrumpet

    bigaggietrumpet Mezzo Forte User

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    Jan 23, 2004
    Nazareth, PA
    Ok, this one shouldn't be too hard to answer. In my quest for a recording of Rachmaninoff's Second Concerto, I ran across, of all things, a recording of Antal Dorati, Byron Janis, and the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra. Were you there, Manny?
     
  2. bigaggietrumpet

    bigaggietrumpet Mezzo Forte User

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    Jan 23, 2004
    Nazareth, PA
    yup, so quick, you didn't even have to answer it. According to ya'll's website (which, granted, I should have checked first), Dorati was the conductor from 1950-1960, or somewhere in there. But I still have to ask if this recording is any good before I let go of my money.
     
  3. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Me?!

    Playing with Dorati in the 50s??!!!

    #@##^&**&*$%#^&&*&**(%&$#@$^&@#$!~!!!!

    Hissy fit officially over. Doing fine now, thank you.

    ML
     
  4. bigaggietrumpet

    bigaggietrumpet Mezzo Forte User

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    Jan 23, 2004
    Nazareth, PA
    hey, originally I didn't know he was the conductor from the 50's. Like I said, I never checked the website until after I posted. How else was I supposed to know?
     
  5. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    I guess Antal Dorati truly belongs to the ages, now.

    Dorati was a fiery Hungarian conductor who led the Minneapolis symphony for ten tremendous years and is associated with the orchestras many Mercury recordings. There were three main Mercury orchestras: the Minneapolis, Detroit, and Chicago.

    Bernie Adelstein made many of the recordings during that era before he left for Cleveland.They also had to re-record many discs when stereophonic recording came out!

    Dorati is noted for his interpretations and also for being the first conductor to record every single of the Haydn symphonies with Philarmonica Hungarica.

    Yes, he's one of those names that just isn't talked about much to the younger generation, unfortunately. Along with Mitropolous, Ansermet, Toscanini, Walter, Furtwangler, Mengleberg, Celebidache, Stokowski, Mravinsky, Rodzinski, and Stock, these conductors' interpretations have fallen to a certain amount of disregard. It's up to the trumpet teachers to talk about these men and make sure they're not forgotten.

    ML
     
  6. Rimshot

    Rimshot Pianissimo User

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    Feb 14, 2005
    Atlanta
    "... Along with Mitropolous, Ansermet, Toscanini, Walter, Furtwangler, Mengleberg, Celebidache, Stokowski, Mravinsky, Rodzinski, and Stock, these conductors' interpretations have fallen to a certain amount of disregard."


    Yes, because all they did was advance the playing of music out the dark age, circus-like approach of 19th century showman. Their approaches, different from one another as they could be, was all about the music, not big effects, or even themselves. Yes, some of them were SOBs of the highest order, but, well, it was a different time. And since the goal of modern education seems to be to erase history rather than understand and mine it, I guess the neglect is to be expected.

    Young musicians should be taught (forced?!) to appreciate old, tinny, scratchy-sounding recordings of great music realized by great musicians before anyone allows them to put on a shiny CD of a Mahler or Bruckner sound orgy--learn music first! (I'm sorry, I know this is anti-trumpet thinking for some...I'll take my medication and go rest...)
     
  7. Annie

    Annie Piano User

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    Nov 13, 2003
    But where do we get those tinny recordings? It's hard to find them...
     
  8. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Annie,

    Again, this is where a teacher should be of real guidance. All my students are used to me asking "Do you still have a phonograph player or do your folks have one?". They're used to it because I'm constantly forcing old recordings down their throats, sending them home with them.

    I couldn't agree more with Rimshot. For as much as I was a brass jock when I was younger and loved listening to the high, loud stuff, I have to say that broadening my ears by listening to other stuff with my friends. Admittedly, I didn't go and do it on my own. I enjoyed it most when one of my buds would say "Hey, check this out!" we'd sit around and listen to stuff they were interested in and it wouldn't neccesarilly be trumpet stuff. That's why I say it's up to us teachers to not be so stuck to CDs and introduce our students to that value of watching a piece of vinyl spinning on a platter.

    ML
     
  9. bigaggietrumpet

    bigaggietrumpet Mezzo Forte User

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    Jan 23, 2004
    Nazareth, PA
    iTunes has a few of the Mercury recordings that Manny was talking about (that's how I even learned Dorati's name). There's also a good source of stuff at used book stores.
     
  10. Mikey

    Mikey Forte User

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    Oct 24, 2003
    This hits home for me too. After going 15 years without owning a turntable, and having all my old LP's sitting in a box, I broke down last week and bought a new turntable (with preamp) from Best Buy. The main reason of course was to be able to burn all my LP's onto CD's. I hooked it up this past Saturday, and proceeded to go through the LP's, until I came across an old RCA recording of Reiner and the CSO doing Zarathustra. I cranked that record, and sat back to listen. OH MY G*D!!!

    Even with the scratches, that recording pinned me to the wall. Herseth nails the crap out of it, and the whole orchestra sounds incredible. And the pipe organ was cranking too.

    Now the test will be: How much of that "sound" will I lose when I burn it to a CD?

    Mike
     

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