a very quick question

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by bigaggietrumpet, Feb 16, 2005.

  1. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

    Age:
    53
    2,259
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    Jan 12, 2005
    Northern New York
    Annie- If you are in college, you should run (not walk) to the library in the music building and look up some of those conductors. Start with Beethoven and Mozart; also look for Otto Klemperer (he has recorded a great Midsummer Night's Dream) (hope I spelled it right!). If not, your local public library deserves a visit. If they don't have any records, you should be able to get them through inter-library loan. When the weather gets nice, start yard-saling. People get rid of records at yard sales (or tag sales or garage sales, whatever you want to call them) for bargain prices. Just be careful of the "Greates Hits of the Romantic Period!" type recordings.. you know things like "Classical Thunder" and "Mozart for Lovers". Generally very cheesy stuff, that. Also, check the casette bargain bins at "record shops" (do they still call them that?) and Wal-Mart check out lines. Classical and Jazz tapes are usually inexpensively priced. Especially the old ones. I found a Buddy Rich tape for $1.00!
     
  2. bigaggietrumpet

    bigaggietrumpet Mezzo Forte User

    801
    1
    Jan 23, 2004
    Nazareth, PA
    I guess since this has turned into a recording thread, I'll go ahead and comment on this one.

    It kinda depends on what program you are using. When I transfered my Harry James LP's to my computer back home, I used a turntable, routed through an amplifier, and then plugged that into the line input jack on the computer's sound card, and recorded using Roxio CD Creater (specifically, their Spin Doctor program). I saved the songs as mp3 files. The quality has been astounding. But that's also because my LP's were in pristine condition, and the turntable had a good cartridge on it (is it sad that I know all this crap about turntables?). Yours may not be as good, but you really shouldn't lose that much.
     

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