aaaarrgh - timing!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by revjames, Jul 18, 2012.

  1. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Methinks you've your eyes too long in the hymnals (Key of C for C instruments and voice). I could suggest you focus on learning the chromatic scale well on trumpet as then however many sharps or flats you encounter will not bother you.

    I've yet to find and transpose music for a C instrument to a Bb instrument that is more than 5 sharps for the C music, but ponder how I would be able to do it should I find such, other than changing it's Key signature for the C instrument music.
     
  2. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    It may come down to anatomy. Ears have physically different mechanisms for hear low frequency percussive notes and high frequency notes.

    Having evolved from bass to drums to ballroom dance to trumpet, the way I overcome issues to think about the interplay between beats per minute and measures per minute and form markers, I'll get to where the form markers come in. Generally what marks the beats per minute? Usually the pulse now, is that pulse fast or slow that depends on the time. The strange thing is that a slow pulse can be in a fast song. What about a fast song with few chord changes here is where the form markers come in often times they are breaks, fills, or melodies. I find hearing the chord changes tough.
     
  3. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    My experience in playing 3rd chair tentatively is that you can't. You are an important part of the ensemble and your bit NEEDs to be there for the rest to work - but you already know this. Play with confidence and you will be more confident - don't try to BLEND yet - try to hear yourself. The trick seems to be that when we try to blend we play too quietly, and so we don't blend, and so we play more quietly in order to blend - can't work. Crank up your volume until -- and here it is -- you can hear the rest of the section in BOTH ears. If you try to blend, then you will hear the others in the ear closest to them - you need to hear them in both ears, and it will only work if your volume is right.

    Try it like this, sing with a friend unaccompanied - you sing and hold a G in the stave and let him (her) sing the A above. Holding the higher note at a fixed volume, sing your note louder and louder and wait for the "Two Ear Thing" to happen. It's counterintuitive I know, but it puts you in exactly the right frame of mind for section work.

    (And all that from a bloke who knows how airplanes work?)
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2012
  4. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    I like that Ted. I was trying to find a way of explaining that with out resorting to the play out every section is important trite sort of mantra that gets spouted (not on here) to people not happy on the back row.
     
  5. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Andrew, these lads and lassies are too clever for the snow job - if you're gunna offer advice you should have tested it before the offering. I HAVE DONE this and it works - I was absolutely gobsmacked and couldn't stop grinning for hours. Insert obvious Aussie expletive here - hmmm p'raps not.
     
  6. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    Wot?

    Ah got it sorry.
     
  7. revjames

    revjames Piano User

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    I actually think 3rd part is more demanding because it isnt the melody you arent playing what you would naturally play if you are used to melodies. Makes you have to think and concentrate a lot more.
     
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  8. jimshaw646

    jimshaw646 New Friend

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    I've been gone for somewhile and have not been able to post. Keeping time while concentrating on the music can be a problem. I know because my teacher asked me why didn't I tap my foot to the beat. That's nothing new, but again I was concentrating too much on pleasing him to think about anything else (the trouble of being single minded?) Also when practicing at home I used an electronic metronome and with the volume up I did not have to think much about timing. Now the problem is gone after i've practiced on a piece long enough so that I do not have to put all of my little brain power onto simply the notes on the paper. Just keep practicing and the timing will come.
    I do have a question off the subject. If one pushes a valve down, using both thumb and index finger and feels a slightly rough spot, other than oiling which should be done everytime before playing, should that valve and sleeve be rehoned?
     
  9. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Clean the valve and casing real well 1st to be sure there isn't foreign matter causing the problem. I like to soak very sticky valves in acetone OUTSIDE!!!!! Be sure the ports between 1st,2nd, & 3rd valve casings are clean and clear. It only takes a small piece of crud to make the valves feel rough. If that doesn't do the job, I suggest taking it to a repairman.
     
  10. jimshaw646

    jimshaw646 New Friend

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    tobylou8, thanks for your suggestion. I've been playing (on and off) for years, have honed my own valves and got so puffed up witih pride that I thought I knew it all. One thing that I never thought of was the simple thing of inspecting the cylinder to see what was causeing the scuff. I really do appreaciate your email. Thanks again, Jim
     

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