About being loud

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by And3, Jun 7, 2014.

  1. And3

    And3 Pianissimo User

    144
    106
    Oct 7, 2013
    East Sussex, UK
    What measures should I take in my practice to play louder?

    I play a couple of hours every day whether for a band rehearsal or self practice and generally have not had problems with being able to play with sufficient volume. I play soprano cornet in a couple of brass bands and trumpet in a 5 piece 'function' band (no mics) and don't have any problems being loud enough. However, when I play lead with a big band I find that I have to try and play much louder and that then affects my sound. I have enough range to get the job done in all of the above settings, but this is affected with the big band playing, just the situation where I need to be loud and high.
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,611
    7,952
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Loud and high are not the problems - they never are. If you have trouble keeping up with the rest in the big band then it is first and foremost the sound concept holding you back. The goal in the big band is not loud and high, it is to lead the section in the proper character of the music. What you report is common from players that have a more or less "classical" approach to playing. There the sound is conceptually very "broad" - more like a cloud. In the big band, the concept is to have a much more "focussed" as well as (oh, can this term be misunderstood) penetrating sound - more like lightening bolts. Things happen to your breathing, articulation and the way you hear.

    The fastest results come when you get some quality time in with a REAL LEAD PLAYER. Then you don't need to talk about what could be, you simply listen and react. It is essentially impossible to hear what YOU need from a recording or internet video. You need to stand next to someone that IS doing a great job and develop a new concept before you start to doctor around on your playing. Once your brain knows what is necessary, you can train body use, breathing, chops, hearing and all of the brain stuff.
     
  3. And3

    And3 Pianissimo User

    144
    106
    Oct 7, 2013
    East Sussex, UK
    This is definitely my background. I have experienced when things do go right. The 'lightening bolt' feeling when the line just sits right with the rest of the band. This is what I must strive towards. I know that feeling of when it does work and realise that I must try to hold onto that as the goal for future improvement. I take the point about needing to play with a real lead player and not expect to just become one without doing this. Thanks.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,611
    7,952
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Just wait until you show up at brass band and lay down the soprano part with the "lead" concept (it will happen). They will give you a one way ticket to the United States.................... ;-)
     
  5. And3

    And3 Pianissimo User

    144
    106
    Oct 7, 2013
    East Sussex, UK
    HA..I have a church fete job with BB this afternoon.. I'll see if I can throw in a few lip trills and shakes during 'Sussex by the Sea'.
     
  6. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

    8,612
    2,128
    Sep 20, 2009
    New York State USA
    confidence in the music your playing will lead to relaxed loudness and better all round playing!!!! (IMHO)
     
  7. strad116055

    strad116055 Pianissimo User

    136
    80
    May 27, 2014
    chicago
    if you can play the parts and you're having trouble being heard, it could be that your equipment is not right for the job. even though the range might be similar from the soprano cornet part to the lead part in the big band, the sound concept would not be the same. if you're pushing your set up (and yourself) to be heard properly, you might want to consider a different set up for lead in a big band. you'll have to work with that equipment the same way you had to learn to play the soprano cornet. but if you are willing to do it every day, you'll get it.
     
  8. And3

    And3 Pianissimo User

    144
    106
    Oct 7, 2013
    East Sussex, UK
    I'm sure you wold agree that there is nothing wrong with my set up. I'm playing a pre war Olds Super trumpet with a Schilke 13A4a mouthpiece. As you mentioned and has been advised before I think it's more to do with focusing in on the big band sound and not bringing my soprano cornet/classical mindset with me to rehearsal.
     
  9. strad116055

    strad116055 Pianissimo User

    136
    80
    May 27, 2014
    chicago
    i'm sorry. "not right for the job" is an overstatement. i should have said maybe there is something out there that could help you with this particular problem. the 13a4 is definitely a lead mouthpiece, and i'm sure your olds is a wonderful instrument. it is also very true that concept is probably the most important thing in playing anything. you might want to consider the instruments in the band you are playing with. since the 30's, brass instruments have undergone lots of changes in their design and construction. the trumpets, and especially the trombones that are built today, are, among other things, simply louder than they were at that time, and the demands of the music are different also. i don't mean to critisize, but i thought if you get the opportunity to experiment with a different horn, you might find something to your liking. anyway, all best and good luck.
     
  10. And3

    And3 Pianissimo User

    144
    106
    Oct 7, 2013
    East Sussex, UK
    Thanks for the best wishes strad116055. My most modern trumpet is a 1982 lightweight strad and I would say that the Super, for me, has the better lead sound.
     

Share This Page