advice for beginners

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by anthony, Aug 30, 2009.

  1. anthony

    anthony Mezzo Piano User

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    Mar 3, 2009
    I have been playing now about 7 months I am a comeback player ,does anyone have any advice for beginning trumpet players ....I have been away a long time ... thank you :-) Anthony
     
  2. Bear

    Bear Forte User

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    Apr 30, 2004
    USA
    Best advice? Meant sincerely man: Get a private teacher in your neck of the woods... preferrably a pro or someone who has been playing more than a decade or two.
     
  3. hichez

    hichez Pianissimo User

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    Jul 13, 2009
    Practice of the right fundamentals and technique with or without the guidence of a teacher is the only way I know to get better. If someone else has a better way tell me
     
  4. anthony

    anthony Mezzo Piano User

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    Mar 3, 2009
    Thanks guys I have a teacher and he is a pro really good teacher my problem is I am having trouble with single tounging just cant seem to get it no matter how much I try he plays it for me but I just have trouble is this normal again I have only been playing 7 months ,Thanks for any help ,Anthony:-)
     
  5. hichez

    hichez Pianissimo User

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    Jul 13, 2009
    Do you have an arbans book? If so I would recommend page 28-31. That personally helped me with tonguing. If the range is to high take the Gs down an ocative.
     
  6. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    May 11, 2009
    Yorba Linda, CA
    Anthony,
    As a fellow comeback player who started 55 years ago and then had a 30 year layoff, I can tell you to try and not become discouraged. When I was young, I could try something and pick it up quickly. Now I am old and my brain and body (just about all of it) do not work like they used to. It takes me a lot longer to learn (or relearn) things and sometime I just have to learn a 'work-around' to try and accomplish the same thing without the same physical skills that I once used. I am still relegated to the toolshed for practicing and I don't know when I will be let out but when I can play through an Arban's exercise without getting light-headed or losing my place more than a couple of times, I feel a great sense of accomplishment. Keep working and it will come back. The tongue is sometimes the most reluctant member to join in - although arthritic fingers will also be a problem.
     
  7. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    Jul 28, 2009
    New Hampshire
    If your teacher is a really good teacher, he should be able to help you with this problem. He should be the one recommending the materials you need to work on to resolve the problem, not people who can't hear you play and see what you may be doing wrong. His playing the music for you will do nothing because you don't have x-ray vision and can't see how he is shaping his tongue nor where he is touching the upper palate to form the "t" attack. He needs to explain it to you in different terms, find a different example for you to try, perhaps to draw you a picture of where he is touching his upper palate with his tongue.

    It's just the "t" sound, only without your vocal chords behind it. Instead there should be a steady stream of air which your tongue slices like slicing salami. The pressure needs to remain behind the air column so that you're blowing just as if you are sustaining a long long note and the tongue forming the "t" sound is what starts each note. But this isn't an easy concept for many people to get, and that's where a good teacher can analyze what you're doing wrong, can ask you questions about how you are thinking about tonguing and forming the notes and other things which he can notice about your playing.
     
  8. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    Jul 28, 2009
    New Hampshire
    I deleted this content because it got posted twice.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2009
  9. anthony

    anthony Mezzo Piano User

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    Mar 3, 2009
    Thanks I have to ask him my teacher to explain it better to me ,you are correct I can not see what he is doing inside his mouth .I tell him that I am having trouble with it and he told me to play short stacacto (not sure I spelled it right) notes Thanks for your help Anthony
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2009
  10. mrtrpt

    mrtrpt New Friend

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    Sep 23, 2007
    the best way to work on single tonguing is in short little segments first. trying to do long strings of tonguing that don't sound great is not the most effective way to get better, although that is probably what 90% of trumpet players do.

    Do something simple like with a C scale (quarter notes): C, C, C, C, rest, rest, rest, rest, D, D, D, D, rest, rest, rest, rest, E, E, E, E....

    you can take this basic idea to any scale or pattern. You should be able to play nice, clean, good sounding quarter notes just like a piano player playing the same exercise.

    You won't see this exercise in many books and it is so simple (in concept) and should be mastered way before you start trying to do things out of the Arban's book if you want to make steady consistent progress.

    When this starts to sound good every time and becomes easy, change it to eighth notes.

    If you have trouble playing 4 clean quarter notes do this loop: SAY "Dah, dah, dah, dah" rest, rest, rest, rest PLAY "C, C, C, C" rest, rest, rest, rest, REPEAT.

    You should be able to play that as easy as you say it (and trying to say it with the right pitch will be an added bonus)

    A few minutes a day every day on this stuff will really help you.

    MR
     

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