Advice from my instructor

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Hornlife98, Nov 20, 2014.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Tomaso, where did you get this myth from? Do you know how a trumpet works? The sound that we hear is a standing wave in the horn. The AC component of our blow (sound) is more or less static. In fact, I glued a headphone driver to a mouthpiece and got a very acceptable trumpet sound and could measure the impedance of the horn too. The only air that moves is the DC component (our exhale). It needs to be carefully dosed so that we have enough air to play phrases, but not back up so much that we suffocate. Bernoulli is of absolutely no significance to the trumpet player except for how the spit key works, and that is more capillary action which is related. This myth about venturi keeps coming up from people that print add text but failed physics. Even if we do have a higher speed in the leadpipe, it is insignificant because once the air has passed the lips, its gone. Fast air across the lips is also BS. The blow is optimum when the lips are supported by air from the oral cavity and mouthpiece. The cup size and throat determine that degree of "support".

     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I will respectfully disagree 100% with this. Compression is exactly where most players get into trouble. If your neck inflates like a balloon, there are other issues. Take a look at Rashawn play his triple C. Tell me that he needs incredible compression for that. He does NOT.

    By the way - a big throat and backbore tell us NOTHING. Some efficient players can play on very open hardware because their embouchures provide the resistance to airflow (anyone successfully using a WildThing has my utmost respect in this camp!). This resistance is critical to being able to phrase. If our air just disappeared, we would not be very musical. If the player has learned to let the hardware provide the backpressure, it can't be too much - otherwise we would suffocate. On the other hand, players that use too much armstrong on the chops generally like open equipment to help them get rid of pent up air. That to me is a sign of a player that needs serious help!

    If we let the standing wave in the horn do the work, we can improve range, endurance and tone and reduce tension AND compression. When we use tension, we only limit our own playing! There are a couple of use cases where lead players use techniques like the "wedge" to influence their tone and energy. That is a very special case that still requires the face and upper body to be very relaxed.

    I will also disagree with air inadequacies being the major problem for wind players. Their bodies are often so screwed up that air is not even the subject. The air part is only the relaxed in and out. The real problems with body used are adequately described above!
     
  3. shooter

    shooter Piano User

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    I think too much emphasis is put on "pressure". A beginner uses major pressure to hit an F on top of the staff, but with time and playing, it gets easier; therefore less pressure. It's not a bad habit to use pressure. It's just a sign that you need to play more. The more comfortable you get playing a high C, you will automatically start using less pressure as your tone becomes more full.
    Don't think, just play. Dont worry about pressure.
     
  4. Hornlife98

    Hornlife98 Pianissimo User

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    The Circle of Breath, theoretically looks simple enough to apply. In reality, it probably takes a while though.

    What about body use? What would perfect body use look like standing and sitting?
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    This is the best that I have found online, although the first hour of a yoga class gets deeper.
    David G. Monette Corporation

    As far as emphasis on pressure, I'll say that it doesn't go away with time for most players. We just learn to live with the limitations. Essentially all of the students that I have had that didn't start with me had pressure issues. We did not ever change the embouchure. We promoted the body habits that led to evolution to a better way. The circle of breath was a low impact way of building the foundation where pressure in its destructive form was not necessary.

    Pressure caps range and endurance. Playing more without addressing the issues leading to pressure just reinforces the habit.
     
  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    The Alexander Technique addresses body use quite well, but it takes time and money to learn. My cheapo version simply involves keeping our head as far away from our butt as possible.
     
  7. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    Unfortunately mine is permanently attached and I can't make it go any further without some form of surgery. :cool:
     

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