Advice needed!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by concordtrumpet, Sep 23, 2008.

  1. concordtrumpet

    concordtrumpet New Friend

    17
    0
    Sep 23, 2008
    Hi guys,

    I strive to be a music educator someday at the collegiate level in either trumpet or voice (I'm not quite sure yet, I love both tremendously). However, I feel that the university I'm currently attending isn't challenging me enough. This is my first year attending college and I'm tempted with the idea of transferring to a larger school such as Oberlin or Northwestern. I do, though, have a very good trumpet teacher who has helped me to grow throughout my high school career.

    Here's my question (a couple, actually) - would it be worth it to save money and stick with it here? Or would graduating from a small college that is not very well known for it's music make it difficult for me to be competitive for graduate school?

    Thanks a lot in advance!

    Matt
     
  2. BrassOnLine

    BrassOnLine Piano User

    Age:
    41
    309
    2
    Nov 22, 2007
    Spain
    Here in Europe, ALL titulations are equal, no matter where you studied, so it should not be a problem when seeking for a job (exept if you study in the UK, which diplomas are not always recognised in the European Union).
    You should study with the persons that would help you to improve your level. No worry about great names.
    Anyway, I know what happen in the USA, so you should think that studying on a well-known university would be an investment.
    Best wishes
     
  3. bagmangood

    bagmangood Forte User

    My first question is, where do you go?
    But think about this: a larger school is not necessarily better, because you can get more personal opportunities to work with the professor. Also, the ensembles might be better, but you'll probably be doing smaller parts.
    Just some food for thought, the person to really ask would be Edward Carroll, because that's what he does for a living
     
  4. DavidLarson

    DavidLarson New Friend

    12
    0
    Sep 23, 2008
    North Vancouver, Canada
    I went to a fairly large university, because of the teacher's reputation and abilities. I was thinking about going to a smaller, more intimate university, but I am glad that I didn't. The teacher's background, contacts, as well as his abilities in teaching and playing were great.
    Best wishes
    DavidLarson
     
  5. bigtiny

    bigtiny Mezzo Forte User

    939
    210
    Aug 14, 2005
    My two cents worth:

    If you have a good trumpet teacher and the program (mus ed?) is certified and acceptable AND you don't have any major problem with your current school (can't function, psycho girlfriend, in trouble with campus drug dealers, etc.) then I would stay put if its working for you financially.

    Here's why. You're getting good instruction on the horn, you're getting good instruction for your mus ed undergraduate degree, and you're not paying out the nose for it. If you want to teach then you should plan on getting a doctorate. That's the only way to really compete for the teaching position(s) you might want these days.

    So, get the undergrad degree, then parlay that into a doctoral tract at a larger school of your choice.....

    bigtiny
     
  6. Graham

    Graham Pianissimo User

    174
    2
    Jun 8, 2008
    Melbourne, Australia
    How far into your course are you? I remember during the first year (particularly first semester), after the novelty factor wore off, I got a bit bored. This was because all the course material was pitched at a really low level, particularly the first few weeks of theory.

    "These are your note values" kinda thing.

    The reason for this became evident at the end of first semester, after the exam period. The Theory lecturer was asking us how we felt about the exam, which was a relatively easy voice-leading exercise. He then showed us an example of a paper that was submitted a couple of years previously.

    Someone had taken their exam paper, and notated the chords in GUITAR TAB, quite incorrectly also, with 7ths on EVERY chord.

    I guess what I'm trying to get at here is that the first semester and a bit is geared towards trying to make sure everyone takes off at the same level. The trumpet tutelage you will get at this level will still be fantastic, but the academic fun REALLY starts toward the end of first year, and the beginning of second year.
     
  7. Graham

    Graham Pianissimo User

    174
    2
    Jun 8, 2008
    Melbourne, Australia
    PS. Once you've finished your current degree, you could always transfer somewhere else for your post-grad studies. A few people I know have their bachelor, honours and masters from three different places!
     
  8. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

    7,797
    2,356
    Oct 18, 2007
    The Wide Brown Land
    Matt, as strange as it may seem, first year students drop out in amazing numbers - in most courses of study. What you may be seeing, (and I don't know US schools at all) is a somewhat obscured attempt to assist those who are in the wrong degree to choose to transfer - leaving the rest of you to better enjoy the resources of your chosen school in your second and subsequent years of study.

    I strongly suspect that Australian universities do this rather surreptitiously to weed out the inapproriate entrants. I have completed my undergraduate degree (4 year Adult Education) and two and a half year post grad degree (Technology Management) at completely different schools. The swap to the second (larger) university was a positive step for me from a facilities perspective - even though the crowds were bigger.

    Do you like your current school, are your grades good, are there more positives than negatives (do a SWOT Analysis (look it up)), are you just reacting to the radiacally different approach to high school. If all is 'good' - stick with it, at least finish the first year and gain the credits, then re-evaluate. In fact, your evaluation process is very healthy at your stage of study - it hits nearly all of us the same way, and should be an ongoing assessment of your learning satisfaction. Ask yourself - what do I want, am I getting the outcome I want, - can I get a better 'product' elsewhere? Good luck, remember - it's YOUR education, no-one else sees it from your perspective.
     
  9. concordtrumpet

    concordtrumpet New Friend

    17
    0
    Sep 23, 2008
    Thanks for all the awesome advice guys!

    I've sort of stepped back in the past 24 hours and looked at my situation subjectively. It seems that I've been swept up in the strong opinions of a few students who really don't like it here.

    But when I think about it, the school in general has a lot of positives - a great cafeteria, dorms, good people, etc. While the wind program may not be the best, I do have tons of time in which to practice - and in large, open rooms to boot. The mus ed dept here is fabulous and I have a lot I could learn from them, and the choir here is looking out to be an amazing experience already. I could go on :p

    My father has his doctorate in the vocal side of music ed, and this will definitely be a topic of discussion when I go home this weekend.

    Matt
     
  10. BrassOnLine

    BrassOnLine Piano User

    Age:
    41
    309
    2
    Nov 22, 2007
    Spain
    Dear Matt,
    Sometimes we could not see far from our nose.
    Though you are doing the right thing.
    BEST WISHES !!!
     

Share This Page