Air-stop v. Tongue Stop: Controversy?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Pedagogy' started by BackInHanoi, Jun 16, 2017.

  1. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    We are, technically stopping notes with the start of the next note. Every time there is a run of non slurred notes. So a last note can be stopped the same way, just cancel the following note you weren't going to play.
     
  2. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Yes, but the common term "stopped note" refers to how you end that note. One way of stopping, is just to end the air. Another way, is to end the sound with a intentional obstruction of the air by the tongue, hence "stopped notes".
     
  3. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    No disagreement here. It is a natural thing for me to stop a note by ceasing the airflow, I think.
    I really don't think about it. That's why it's natural.
    By the way, besides the director asking for it, or deciding a piece of music needs such a tongue stop.
    But my question would be, is there a specific notation calling for a tongue stop?

    AUTO CORRECT!!! hate is a strong word, but for lack of anything stronger, I HATE auto correct. Sometimes
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2017 at 11:59 AM
  4. Lukarino

    Lukarino Pianissimo User

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    My band director says that a rooftop accent (^) is the only notation warranting a tongue stop. However, that is completely his own interpretation. I heard a story about a study done once among the top band directors around the US. A certain rhythm (with accents and the like) was sent to these directors, and each director wrote a small paragraph detailing how it should be interpreted. Each and every one had a different explanation as to how it should be played.
     
  5. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    In my opinion, that is true, most often, probably.
     
  6. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    I've never seen it. It's understood in some situations, but to answer your question - never seen it.
     
  7. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    Right? I know string players have the notation for when to pluck, ( I forget the term for it, since it's not my field ), and even when to start the bow and how long to pull, then how long to go the other way, but trumpet players? We're on our own.
     
  8. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Pizzicato.

    Apples and Oranges. Very different animals.
     
  9. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    Maybe so, but at least they have a symbol for it. And it is an articulation, of sorts, so maybe not so different?
     
  10. cb5270

    cb5270 Pianissimo User

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    I'm late to this thread, but I was taught to NEVER stop a note with the tongue. When playing staccato stop the breath briefly in keeping with the length of the note, ta_ta_ta_, not tat-tat-tat. If there is the rare need for a very abrupt ending stop the breath with a very brief closure very low in the throat. Disclaimer: This info is 60+ years in the past and may be, like myself, obsolete.
     
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