Air Support/Breathing/etc...

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Bear, Dec 28, 2005.

  1. rjzeller

    rjzeller Forte User

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    Rochester, MN
    Bill -- that's an excellent post!! I could never figure why others who play at my level could never hold a long tone out as long as I do. I would always do at least one during a warmup and the entire ensemble would turn and stare wondering when the heck I would run out of air.

    I guess that explains it.

    The odd thing is that on humid days or any time I am suffering a cold or allergies, I can't shake that "stale air" sensation; but in the winter time I'm usually fine, and that's often when my playing is at its best....

    Again, great post. I appreciate the new information!
     
  2. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    Metro Detroit
    Bill Wrote:
    Emphasis mine cw

    Great Bill!

    I always hear that; "How can you play such long phrases?"
    That 'splains it.

    Happy New Year!

    Chuck
     
  3. W Scott

    W Scott Piano User

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    Dec 8, 2003
    Carson City, NV.
    Actually, that 'stale air' feeling with humid air, colds or allergies is not odd. Asthma is a condition where (I'm being simplistic here for anyone with medical training) the lung tissues fills up with fluid, and the smooth muscle of the small airways to spasm. You wind up trapping air down in the lower areas of the lung. Most asthmatics don't do well with humid air because your lungs already have too much moisture in the tissues. You wind up with a sensation of smothering, and that mental stress can set off bronchospasm along with further air trapping.

    Oddly enough, I'm one of the asthmatics who does well with high humidity. I lived for several years in Ohio and loved the humid summers. Then, I moved back out west (where I'm from) and now what I love about summers is finding a swamp cooler to lay under on hot days! It drives my wife nuts as she can't stand a swamp cooler.

    The cold, dry winter air is really hard on my lungs. I use one of those face masks that skiers use to hold the moisture in close.

    The one thing you can do to keep asthma under control is use the inhaled steroids such as Asthmacort or Aerobid. Use them every day, year round because asthma is a serious disease that can kill you!

    Bill
     
  4. rjzeller

    rjzeller Forte User

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    Rochester, MN
    Again, I appreciate the input Bill. Good comments.

    I'm one who struggles mightily in the humidity. I have family out west (Salt Lake City and Phoenix), and everytime I go visit them I never want to come back. Especially Phoenix -- I never feel tired or "smothered" when I'm there. The dry air suits me perfectly.

    For the same reason, I do better in the winter time around here. Except that the last couple weeks it has been damp and cool, and unusually humid, so I'm having issues lately as well...

    I appreciate the explanation -- I've always wondered why humidity made things worse for me.
     
  5. wrbandel

    wrbandel Pianissimo User

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    Mar 9, 2005
    Rochester, MN
    Wow!

    Add one more member who has asthma. I've had full blown asthma now for almost two years. I did the albuterol for a while until my doctor put me on a stronger inhaler.

    Warren
     
  6. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    Metro Detroit
    Warren,

    What are you on?

    I'm on Albuteral and a Flowvent oral steroid twice a day.

    The worst is the prednisone, or Medrol.

    Horrible weight gain and face bloating from those bad boys!

    -cw-
     
  7. W Scott

    W Scott Piano User

    488
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    Dec 8, 2003
    Carson City, NV.
    Chuck, the weight gain and bloating are the least of the problems. Prednisone will make your bones brittle and makes your skin bruise easily. There can also be serious mental affects such as severe depression, psychosis and uncontrolled rage. The trick as an asthmatic is to figure out what triggers your asthma and then stay away from those triggers---even if it means moving to another area or giving up a pet.

    My trigger is (mostly) smog. I can't live in an area where there is smog for any length of time. I have an allergic type of asthma and my lungs can completely shut down if exposed to high levels of pollutants. So, I'm in windy Nevada where any smog gets blown away.
     
  8. wrbandel

    wrbandel Pianissimo User

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    Mar 9, 2005
    Rochester, MN
    Chuck,

    I was using Aerobid, and just recently my Doc put me on Advair diskus (a powder inhalation), due to inhaling some mold dust while doing a home remodeling project. Of all things, I'm remodeling my music studio due to the mold. One way or another, music will find a way to bite you in the butt.
    :-o


    Warren
     
  9. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    May 11, 2005
    Metro Detroit
    Hi Warren,

    I have been on both of those.
    The Advair did NOT work for me. I cannot tolerate any of the dry powder inhalations. They gave me a paradoxical asthma attack.

    Bear my asthma was a result of a occupational exposure.
    I developed cobalt poisoning.

    I was a tool maker for the automotive industry in metro Detroit.
    I 1995 I developed a rash which would not go away when I worked. If I was home a couple weeks it would go away, but came back when I returned.
    To make a long story short, I ended up at one of the countires best occupational/environment clinic in the country.
    They tested me and took 18 vials of blood. I had to draw pictures of my work place.
    It turned out that the carbide cutting tools I used were emulsified with cobalt. It turns out that a lot of people have this, but jut write it off as asthma and never get diagnosed properly.
    I just happened to go to the top cobalt specialist in the country. (the most hated by the insurance companies also I might add)
    My lungs are only about 55% and will never get better.

    Anyway, the asthma is for the most part under control.

    -cw-
     
  10. silverstar

    silverstar Mezzo Forte User

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    Jan 6, 2005
    The type of asthma I have is 'exercise induced'. I really don't know that I have it unless I try to run/march or anything like that. I actually didn't know I had it until 9th grade, when I went in for a physical and happened to bring up that I was having problems breathing in Show Choir and Marching band. Like I had a brick on my chest or something...

    I've always had problems in winter when it gets cold because I get bronchitis a lot easier than everyone else, and it's bad. I get a cough that sounds like I'm a heavy smoker or something. I've actually had doctors ask if I smoke heavily because of my cough. lol.

    I've never been on a nebulizer, though my brother has one because his asthma is really quite bad. I'm supposed to be taking Advair twice a day, but, I kinda forget about it. :oops: (And while I was taking it regularly, I didn't notice it helping when I needed it to, actually, it doesn't really do anything...)

    I was born in New Mexico and lived there until I was 8. That was dry heat, and it really wasn't fun. I am one of the people that looks forward to summer when it's 90% humidity and 80 or 90 degrees out. The dry heat in New Mexico really didn't do anything for me.

    It's really interesting to find out the number of us who have asthma. It's actually quite interesting. We should start a club. lol.

    Lara
     

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