Air Support/Faster Air

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by eliserachel, Nov 30, 2014.

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  1. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    Cool air/warm air

    I just play.
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I think that you don't have enough information to make any assumptions at the playing pressures and air quantities really used while playing.

    Blow up a balloon, stretch the neck so that it squeals. Play with the tension to change pitch. Then have a helper increase pressure on the balloon to try and increase volume and or speed. Watch and listen to what happens to your squeal. In any case if you are observant, you will not post what you did ever again.

    What your level of understanding has ignored:

    The lips react to force (they get "blown out"). The force behind and in front of the lips must be essentially equal for an embouchure to properly function unless we clamp it off with armstrong and stretch it like a balloon.
    The aperature that is constantly changing while playing diffuses any airstream
    The throat of the mouthpiece controls the pressure in the cup and the amount of air that can pass

     
  3. Tomaso

    Tomaso Pianissimo User

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    Quote: "How do you practice pushing air faster through your trumpet? "

    Blow harder. No I'm not kidding. What do you think all those players with necks bulging and red faces who are playing high notes are doing? They're blowing harder, creating more pressure through the mouthpiece. We can talk all day about not blowing harder for high notes but when all is said and done just take a look on UTube and see reality for yourself.
    The answer is, just blow harder. When you blow harder the air moves faster. It's simple physics.
    Unless of course you want to contemplate your "diaphragm" or some other anatomical part that has nothing whatever to do with playing high notes on a trumpet and try to figure out its relevance.

    T/
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The air does not move faster, but that is not the point. As long as the chops are mangled by armstrong and the upper body is tense, you have to blow harder just to even get them to open and close. Blowing harder does not solve that! The reality on YouTube by those who are not a hacks is this:
    Rashawn Ross With Adam Rapa Gives A Lesson On How To Play Triple C! - YouTube
    Rashawn Ross Plays Dean's RAJA III B-flat - Bebop To "E" Over Triple C! - YouTube
    Wayne Bergeron High Notes with his GR Mouthpiece. - YouTube
    Allen Vizzutti One Handed Double High C - YouTube
    Allen Vizzutti One Handed Double Eb-Ouch! - YouTube

    You have to get the pressure off of the chops and then learn that less is more. If you get a chance to see Tower of Power, do so. Tell me that force lets you play a 3 hour gig like that.

    We can talk about physics as it applies to hydraulics, there you need great pressure to lift things like cranes. That type of motion is gross motor skill. The embouchure is different. We are not lifting anything. It is fine motor skills - like a surgeon with a scalpel. We are maintaining a monostable frequency for our lips opening and closing. If the pressure on the back is appreciably higher than from the cup, the lips fall into the mouthpiece. This is exactly the "crash and burn" that happens to those armstrong players when they get tired - lips fall in the cup and nothing is vibrating to create any more sound. Blowing even harder is stupid. Fix the real problem gives lasting results!

     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I am thinking they are working their asses off for no apparently good reason and will never make it though a 4 hour gig.
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Yep, and sometimes reality really bites doesn't it Tomaso?
     
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    This is much like my "magic bubbles" concept. When we play a note, the air column inside the instrument has defined and mathematically predictable areas of high pressure and no pressure. In physics these are known as nodes and anti-nodes. The higher the tone, the more of these nodes inside the instrument. With a horn of sufficient light weight, we can play a long tone and can gently run a finger up and down the leadpipe and/or bell and feel some of the vibrations. Change to a different harmonic and that place will move.

    Now for the esoteric part. Playing a long tone, we can shift our awareness to inside the trumpet, and imagine/feel a point of resistance somewhere inside the horn. I call these "magic bubbles." To slur up, we can "blow" this magic bubble further away, backing off will allow the magic bubble to return to its place closer to the mouthpiece.

    Our body will memorize the feel of these notes and nodes much more quiclky than the cognitive control of several variables can. Remember that the embouchure is (or should be, in the Zen Vulgano philosophy)formed in part by the note that it is playing.
     
  8. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    The source of your air equals only your lung capacity. How much there is isn't all that significantly different from one adult person to another unless there is impairment. How much of it is released is controlled by the aperture when we exhale. It is my belief that a constant exhale with a tighter aperture makes higher notes easier to attain and conversely a more open aperture works better on the lower notes. As long as the lips vibrate and produce a tone, Pressure or speed / velocity of the air play no role in producing a note. Aging alone make the effort/strain to control the lip and facial muscles more difficult ... tell me about it.
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I wonder if anyone ever told Maynard that he'd never make it through a 4 hour gig.
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    No because he actually was not one of those players that worked that hard. Maynard if you recall was the dude that dangled the trumpet by a string (without holding it) and blew his normal range.
     
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