Air Support/Faster Air

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by eliserachel, Nov 30, 2014.

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  1. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I went to see Maynard a number of times - once I was seated so close to him in Blues Alley in DC that I could have reached over and touched him. That man blew hard, and he used a fair amount of pressure on his chops when he played. I've heard of Bill Chase doing the string trick, but not Maynard.
     
  2. Tomaso

    Tomaso Pianissimo User

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    Yeah, well, go look at the many, many professional trumpeters on YouTube who do play 3-hour gigs with red faces and bulging necks, then you tell me.
    We can concoct all the theories we want about how it should be done but that's what most of it is - theory.
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Maynard come from a long line of first string players. While at Colorado State, he came by to one of our band rehearsals, where he in fact, suspended his trumpet on a string in front of us, then played the Opening from the Theme from Rocky. He used the Jettone at the time. He told me the virtues of the Jettone, and that day, I went out to purchase one, the Studio B that I still use to this day when I play lead. Maynard left a deep impression on me that day, as he did with Alen Weiss that was playing third chair in our big band at the time. He soon after joined Maynard in his big band as he too was so influenced by that visit.
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    And just think, if they were more relaxed, they could have made it to a 4-6 hour gig. Bottom line, they are working too hard and could endure longer if they would just relax. Endurance is relative.
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    PS: My relatives seem to endure me... they drink a bit too... could be related... I am not entirely sure though.
     
  6. Tomaso

    Tomaso Pianissimo User

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    Way to go, Gmonady! You've got reductio ad absurdum down pat!
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    My PhD however is in realism, but yes, you have to Master absurdium as a prereq to then moving forward to understanding realism.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    OK, my PhD is really in quantum chemistry... same thing though.
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I don't need to watch YouTube, I am on stage playing with these people (doing it right). I have been playing and teaching this way all of my life. There is no reason to defend "a wrong way". On the side I coach professionals that have crashed and burned. I help them get a life. There is no need to play unintelligently and even less reason to talk about it in a thread designed to help in a very practical way. The human body is resilient - for a while anyway. YouTube is not proof of anything.

    Maynard is another story. His playing suffered greatly due to many things suboptimal. I know of 5 ruptures. On the other hand, he made great music in SPITE of the issues. If you check his playing out in the 50's, you see a much better situation. Still, you have to be careful about what you think that you see, he was a showmaster and the last half of his career definitely showcased that aspect. His audience thought that it looked cool to rip the trumpet off of your face...........

     
  10. Smrtn

    Smrtn Pianissimo User

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    I don't think you have an understanding of a purely physical situation such as what I described. If you did, you wouldn't post what you posted ever again. ;) Mine was a simple illustration, which, if you think about, you'll understand.

    Of course, variables enter into play with one's physical appendages and one's personal physiology. But - the illustration of fast slow is very simple yes, and therefore easy to understand. Also, I think you might be confusing the terminology of pressure and speed. Pressure equates with speed, and vice versa.

    heat - Why does the air we blow/exhale out from our mouths change from hot to cold depending on the size of the opening we make with our mouth? - Physics Stack Exchange

    "If you blow through a tight mouth, there is smaller volume of air but a higher velocity"
     
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