Airy high notes?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by musikman, Dec 22, 2011.

  1. musikman

    musikman New Friend

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    Dec 21, 2011
    Hey guys, I'm a young trumpet player and my highest note that i can play is a high G. Well, every once in a while I'll go to play high, and everything above a high C is reallllyyy airy.... almost just air. I've tried lots of techniques but then again... it only happens on certain days. Other days, i can play up there fine. Any help would be great... thanks :D
     
  2. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    You need better muscle. It will come as you play more. Work on your pedal tones, as in below low F#. If you want the fingerings just let me know. By working on the pedal tones you will build more muscle to allow you to go higher easier and with better tone.

    To go high, you must go low first.
     
  3. musikman

    musikman New Friend

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    Dec 21, 2011
    Thanks man, yeah I do some peddle tones. Although there is two ways i can do them. I'm not sure which one is right. One way it sounds really low and kind of like a low buzz. (sounds a little bit like a fart to be honest lol) The other way sounds like an actual trumpet sound, but just lower than F#. Which one is right?

    By the way. I don't have private lessons but i've been saving up for them. I do get a lot of instruction from other older band members though. :D thanks for the advice man.
     
  4. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    actual trumpet sounds are the best way to produce music. -- Also try soft long tones in the staff, hold them as long as you can, rest in between tone -- make the best sound you can in the staff --------eventually with enough time and practice this will actually help the upper register --- seems contrary to what one would think --- but soft long tones (play them musically) helps a wide variety of chop and chop strength. High register, just doesn't happen overnight -- good high register takes time -- but it can be done!!!!!!!!!! (you want the outside of your embouchure/ face muscles to be able to hold a small aperture in the center of your lips that is free to vibrate- that makes the best sound)..
     
  5. musikman

    musikman New Friend

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    Dec 21, 2011
    Alright, so, I think I'm gonna do this ...1. Soft long tones 2. Peddle tones 3. Lip flexibilities.... + the rest of my usual practice. Thanks for the help guys!!! Any more tips and tricks will be gladly accepted!
     
  6. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    patience with yourself!!!!!! try not to get frustrated, cause that never helps -- also be sure to rest within a practice (play 3 minutes - rest 3 minutes -- keeps the blood flowing in the lip) --only enough mpc pressure on the lips to make a seal (that is key to good pedals -- low mpc to lips contact pressure) ---oh and rest between days of practice. If you do a very hard practice on long tones one day - then concentrate on lip flexibility or some other exercises the next day (that gives you a day for parts of the embouchure to rest a bit, hopefully you wont' be stressing the same muscle group each day that way) ----muscles need a day or so to recooperate --

    Oh yes -- and octave slurs will help (you shouldn't have to move your embouchure to much to do these) -- and that is the trick in that eventually you should be able to do your whole range without repositioning the mpc, and essentially with very small adjustements within the embouchure. so octave leaps (as softly as possible -- C to C, D to D, etc ----don't push it either --- if you can't do it relatively easily --then don't force it --- you will get it in time...
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2011
  7. musikman

    musikman New Friend

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    Dec 21, 2011
    Ok this sounds like really good advice, thanks for all the help. I also tried playing simple songs up an octave, like Maynard Ferguson once recommended. You also say that you should rest for every 3 minutes. What about when I'm doing Big Band music, and that goes on for like 7 minutes each song? Shouldn't I try to play longer, so i can build my endurance up?
     
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    definitely play longer (but do that in the staff where it is comfortable) -- in the staff work - builds endurance without stressing the embouchure. Also, instead of trying everything an octave up, you can go a third or fourth -- something that is comfortable at whatever your range is now. (the third or fourth up will probably cause you to transpose the music -- which helps learn more music, and musicality in different keys). Endurance is a time thing also - you can build endurance without killing your chops --- it just takes time, like everything else.
     
  9. musikman

    musikman New Friend

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    Dec 21, 2011
    Ok. Once again, thanks for alll of the advice, it really does help!
     
  10. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Long tones. That's absolutely what you need to build endurance and focus and sound you want for the higher range. Working in the staff has greater effects on your sound and range than you'd think.
     

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