Alex Yates 3C

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by crowmadic, Feb 6, 2007.

  1. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    Alex,
    In a reply to my "3C OUCH!" Thread you said, "At this time in my life I see a 3C in my future," (or something to that effect). Can you explain why changes in mouthpiece is dictated by the time in our life, and how a 3C will be better than your 1C........thanks, tom
     
  2. Alex Yates

    Alex Yates Forte User

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    Aug 11, 2005
    Atlanta, GA
    Hey Tom!

    Me and my big fat mouth! LOL. (just kidding....quoting Jackie Gleason from his Honeymooner days)

    I have played a 1C or variation thereof for ..... gulp ....... 22 years. Now I am noticing (for the first time ever) certain things becoming a bit more work. I have also been doing a lot more recitals and master classes than I used to do which means playing a lot of solo repertoire. My training and focus for many years was orchestral playing. Being a soloist requires (for me) a little different skill-set and approach. When I tried this particular 3C (It was a Mt Vernon copy I believe), I still felt comfortable and still sounded like me. A light bulb went off and I thought to myself that if I could keep these two aspects (comfort and maintaining MY sound) and add to the comfort and ease, why not try it out? Now, I might end up trying a 3C for a week or so and decide it isn't for me because my lips might swell too much or something like that. I also wouldn't attempt a change in mid-work season and would wait until the summer so I could really experiment. It also might be the case that the 3C makes nothing easier. It is mainly based on the individual. A 1C rim has ALWAYS felt like home to me. With age, it is suddenly feeling a bit "roomy" after doing a few sessions of playing. The only reason I would consider the 3C in a couple of years would be if the 1C just began to feel too big all of the time and hindered my abilities.

    Gosh, I hope this explains some things for you. I know it was a bit scattered, but this is just an honest, off the top of my head answer. If you have any further questions that I did not address, please ask.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Alex,
    I couldn't agree more! Why should we beat ourselves up? If slightly smaller means more fun AND nobody in the audience notices, why not! I certainly hope that people measure my playing by what comes out of the bell - not on what is between that and my face!
     
  4. mike ansberry

    mike ansberry Forte User

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    I started out on a 7C like most of us. Went to college and was informed that to be a good player I had to play a 1C. (by the instructor) So I played a 1 for 4 years. For me it was like walking around in shoes that were too big. After college I went to a 5C. Played it for a while then went to a 3C. Found a home! It was a good fit for me. Then I stumbled across a 3B. It felt just as good, but has a bigger, fatter sound. Now when I'm playing lead I try to use a shallow piece because I'm not strong enough to blow 4 hours of lead on the 3B. Wish I was, but in the last set the F's and F#'s don't want to work. But I find that i "bottom out" in the shallow piece, an Allen Vizzuttie Marcinkiewicz.
     
  5. timothypierson

    timothypierson Pianissimo User

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    Feb 20, 2005
    I used to play on large mouthpieces and found that I tired easily. Currently, I use a Kanstul copy of a Mt Vernon 7B with a Warburton 10 backbore for orchestral playing and a Kanstul Mt Vernon 7C with a 76 backbore for big band playing. The smaller rim gives me better endurance. In fact on Wednesdays,I have 5 hours of rehearsals, that includes symphonic band (1st parts), Jazz ensemble (2nd book) and orchestra (principal) and still sound fresh at the end of the day. I think playing what is most comfortable for each individual is the way to go.
     
  6. Alex Yates

    Alex Yates Forte User

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    What is funny for me Timothy is that a 1C never seemed LARGE to me. I have my double pedals up to an "F" (for all of you screamers, that is the low F above the staff. ;-) ) fairly easily and that is all I have needed in the rep that I play. There are larger setups - someone here plays a Stork 1.5 - those suckers are HUGE. I also tried a Curry a few months back that I could have taken a bath in and 1X's, fuggedaboudit! I guess it is all relative. I also believe folks with overlapping front teeth or a gap between their front teeth suffer less swelling interference than those who have a straight row. They may swell just as much, but with the gap or overlap, there is a place for the extra flesh to go. (This is something I have been observing for a long time with teachers, students and colleagues.) I have straight, sealed front teeth and a 1C always allowed for that minor swelling (and I don't use a lot of pressure at all), which usually happens pretty early on once I begin playing.
     
  7. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    Alex, I got the education I hoped for from your answer, as well as the other TMers. I'm sensing that size doesn't matter (I don't mean to affend). Perhaps I should have said numbers and letters are primary references but still vary from manufacturer to manufacturer. A stock 3C made by Schilke may feel different than one made by Bach. Am I getting this mouthpice picture right? Because if I am, I'm going to pull the rest of my hair out and take up slide whistle.
     
  8. Alex Yates

    Alex Yates Forte User

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    Glad to be of some help Tom. And yes, you've got it right. Size doesn't really matter, it is the end result that matters. I.E. What comes out of your soul into the instrument and washes into the world....MUSIC.
     
  9. cornetguy

    cornetguy Mezzo Forte User

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    if it helps you get the sound you want, has reasonably decent intonation and feels good on the face it probably is the best thing for you right now. it doesn't matter what anyone else says, or what the numbers on the mouthpiece are.
     
  10. Alex Yates

    Alex Yates Forte User

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    You nailed it Franklin.
     

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