All Harmon all the time.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by turtlejimmy, May 17, 2012.

  1. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    I did, but I like to play at 6 am. :oops:


    Turtle
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    So do I while my wife is still sleeping at other end of our house, but I'm using Yamaha Silent Brass mute enduring the back pressure of a mute, but didn't go to the greater expense of acquiring a "studio" shed. I assume you are not playing in your shed still in your pajamas, skivies or buff.
     
  3. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Hahahaha ..... No, actually, I'm coffeed up, done with cat chores (letting him out, letting him in, feeding him, etc ..), watering (my flying hedges need to be watered daily in summer) and posting online, fully dressed. Soundproof is a relative term. I can go in there at 5 am and play my stereo to a certain number on the volume dial, and not even the birds hear it. I can play trumpet at that hour, with the Harmon mute in, if I don't wail on it (which, as you know, is not easy to do).

    I pulled the tuning slide about 1/3 to 1/2 more than it's very normal spot (on my Recording) and whoah, Nelly, does that make it a lot easier. Have to mind intonation a tiny bit more, but not much. I'll try this for a while.


    Turtle
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    This little turtle went to market.
    This little turtle stayed home.
    This little turtle had roast beef,
    This little turtle had none.
    And this little turtle went wah wah wah all the way home!
     
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  5. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    You got to pull on the reins and give Nelly some bit when you shout "Whoa". Extending the tuning slide falsely gives the effect of a more open blow forcing more lip control of intonation with skews in the instrument design. The habit of this will cause havoc when you abandon the mute. As at least implied earlier, all mutes add back pressure to playing and the only resolvement is to toughen up as is not instant access or success.

    I am not one to concur with the attempt to sound like Miles, Maynard or any other. My goal is to sound like me and you should pursue the goal to sound like you IMO. Obviously, our voices sound different, so why not our instrument sounds.

    Now alternately I play 30 minutes and rest 15 minutes, I'm recently begun my own logging chart of "lip time" as to include only the time I practice or play. I gave copies of this chart to the 4 boys I've been tutoring to log their "lip time" over the summer. I don't normally attempt any lip time on Sundays, unless to rehearse early in the morning what I'll later perform in church.

    My wife's cat "Snoop" escaped into a forest upon our return from visting daughtr nad grandaughter in TN just as she was being loaded into her cage for return by the caretaker. "Snoop" was an indoor cat, with front paws declawed, spayed, and an identity chip implanted. She has no defense in the wild or possible escape up a tree. Healthwise I'm unable to assist in the search for her, but my wife and friends have now spent many days seeking her without success. Yes, my wife has incurred a severe onset of poison ivy, but so far not been bitten by a copperhead snake as are prevalent in this area.

    While my wife does this, I get the time to practice without YSB.
     
  6. Satchmo Brecker

    Satchmo Brecker Piano User

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    Would anyone here endorse practicing with a Harmon Mute as a general practice technique, versus why turtle is doing it? By this I mean for a few practice sessions do exactly what you normally do, Arbans, scales, whatever, BUT do it with the mute in place. Seems like getting to the point where the added back pressure becomes normal would help when playing without the mute. Sort of like wearing ankle weights when you go out for a walk or run.
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Satchmo Brecker, what you've stated is the benefit of practice with any mute, including the YSB which I often must use, and I'm doing so with the medical diagnoses of COPD. It's OK for me, but I do not prefer the usage of any mute.
     
  8. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Yes, yes, YES!!! My thought exactly ...... I do the same thing with guitar, spend most of my practice time on acoustic, whether it's rhythm or lead, and then, when I switch to electric, it's like the ankle weights came off, and I can do almost anything easily, including the stuff that was hard on the acoustic.

    But, also, I'm hoping to zero in on the centers of my notes with the Harmon, which is maddeningly hard sometimes (most of the time). And Ed, I wouldn't mind trying to sound like ME, if I sounded better. :lol:ROFL


    Turtle
     
  9. MTROSTER

    MTROSTER Piano User

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    Turtle, Harmonise:D
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Turtle, I really can't remember the last time I played a trumpet with a Harmon mute, but I'll attribute it to sometime when I was in college. Too, I don't know where that one went to ... I may still have it in one of the unpacked boxes here, but I've now two more in my mute bag, one copper and a much newer one as is aluminum. I positively don't now have the trumpet I played in college as was a rented Getzen.

    Never is there not the goal to improve! IMO you've a better trumpet than any one of mine and perhaps a better mpc, but the latter is debatable because a mpc is only as good as the player using it. The best I can say about your mpc is that it has more monetary value than any one, two, three plus of mine. All this said, doesn't make you a better player than me ... not that I aspire to compete with you or anyone else. I just relax and enjoy playing what I have (and can afford) to the best of my ability.

    With health issues, I was about to give up the brass and devote myself to the keyboard and to my paternal Grandma's acoustic mandolin which I have had rehabbed. Since coming to NC, I've twice set in with the mando on gigs playing blue grass, a genre I don't like. While my wife doesn't like blue grass either, she did suggest I get an electric one simply because I sing country genre well with it. Ah, shucks! I still haven't got an electric one, but I've got a considerable collection of picks, mostly vintage and many bone, and one I've been told is ivory. Most of this collection was Grandma's, but I've added substantially to it, as now fills about three 2 gallon size pickle jars. There are several with scrimshaw artwork on them. I got 'em, but have no desire to learn to play my paternal Grandad's fiddles.
     

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