Am I missing something?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by 40cal, Jun 1, 2006.

  1. 40cal

    40cal Forte User

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    Dec 13, 2005
    Minnesota
    I find it interesting with the talk about the different "methods" that exist, who studies or advocates what. I have certainly learned stuff to better my playing with all the discussion.

    However, as a weekend warrior as far as trumpet playing, I find myself lacking the time and energy to get in to a routine as far as practicing. What I end up playing is usually stuff I have for my next gig. Absent a gig in the near future, I find an etude book to blow some stuff out of.

    I haven't the foggiest idea what "method" or "school" that I subscribe to. I have been blessed with some good teachers that have taught me some fundamentals that make sense.

    Maybe this is a blessing in disguise. I generally take what works for me, and discard what does not.
     
  2. trumpetmike

    trumpetmike Forte User

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    I am in a very similar position and it is something I didn't even think about until I started chatting on TH/TM - I have spent a fair amount of time since then trying to work out where my teaching has come from, or where my teachers' influences have been - I have come to the conclusion that I have been taught by a couple great musicians, who have themselves been taught by great musicians.
    It seems to be something that is less common in the UK, coming from one particular school of teaching. If you start tracing teaching trees back, it is possible to see some common roots, but it isn't often referred to as a school.
    So many players over here have started in the brass band world ("who cares about the embouchure, just blow it" type attitude) that the concentration seems to be much more on making the music rather than the mechanics behind it.

    That said, learning about the various schools of US teaching has been fascinating for me - I am still trying to work out what I do (with reference to the US examples - just so I can explain to US guys what it is that I do), but I try not to let it get in the way - each school seems to have some great stuff in it, I tend to pick and choose exercises from all over the place and use what works for me (what worked for me when I was studying at university) - it seems to be working well with my more advanced students.
     
  3. cornetguy

    cornetguy Mezzo Forte User

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    Saint Paul, MN
    thats's right if it works for you use it, if it doesn't don't. but don't write it off, it may work for your students, we are all a little different and have to work with our own idiosyncracies.
     
  4. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
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    Guys, I'm in the same boat. All I know is that my background is what was standard for kids in the late 60's and 70's. Arban's, St. Jacome's, and a lot of playing varied repertoire for band, orchestra, and jazz band.

    My teachers taught as they did in a very traditional sense without referring to a specific physical method of approaching the horn. So, I can't say that I subscribe to a system of playing above another. Although it is amusing to see myself referred to in forums that do. "Hey, is he BE or is that TLC? Or did he just have a BM? OK, who's got a PHD that can figure it out?" Whatever.

    Cal, I wouldn't bother with pigeonholing yourself. You may read something tomorrow and decide you want to approach the horn a whole 'nother way as I or T'mike might. My breathing patterns sure have changed from when I was a kid. So has my tonguing.

    The audience couldn't care less. All they want to hear are beautiful tones that make them happy.

    ML
     
  5. trumpjosh

    trumpjosh Pianissimo User

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    Dec 13, 2003
    Why is this book so rarely used? I loved it when I was in high school. The etudes are so much more challenging and musical than those in the Arban's book.

    I've always wondered why more teachers didn't have students work out of it. Try the "Grand Artistic Studies" sometime. The duets (the 12 long ones) are also some of the best available.

    - Josh
     
  6. trumpetmike

    trumpetmike Forte User

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    And if you have got any sense, you will read what Manny has to say in favour of anything I might write - I am not worthy to be included in the same breath (trust me - I've heard both of us!)

    I have a revelation moment with my tonguing when I saw Dave Hickman give one of his talks at ITG Texas - I was listening to him thinking "nah, that's not right" but my brain was also saying "this is Dave Hickman - he's a God - I wonder..." So I went to the practice rooms and tried it how he was saying - the results were greater clarity, so I changed how I tongue. He was right (no surprise).
    What I was doing before was fine, but what he described improved it greatly.
     
  7. Bruce Lee

    Bruce Lee Piano User

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    Oct 24, 2003
    Rochester, NY
    Interesting topic!

    Granted, many trumpet players learned from great teachers... all over the world. For the most part, the different "schools" represent the ideologies of teachers with solid/proven backgrounds. The success of the students perpetuates the success of the school, or what is better described as the "system" which is used.

    Another reason why these "systems" exist is because not all trumpet players have had the good fortune to have great teachers. To a very large extent, the failure rate or attrition of trumpet players within the broad spectrum of music programs can be attributed to the fact that there are lesser quality teachers out there. Therefore, it has always been up to the student, or parents of that student, to find quality teachers... or, better put, quality "trumpet" teachers.

    Since the US is so large, it is no wonder that there are a number of "systems". I would hazard a guess to say that the success rate of the students of teachers who have backgrounds in the proven "systems" tend to produce a much higher number of quality trumpet players.

    I also believe that the more efficient the embouchure, the fewer differences that exist between the "systems". I think that it's great that we have so many choices available, because it allows us to find teachers who can communicate effectively for those with different learning needs. And, as has already been pointed out, a good teacher can never have enough in their "bag of tricks".

    I hope that some of this makes sense. ;-)

    My favorite saying, "We are all perpetual students of the trumpet."

    Bruce
     
  8. 40cal

    40cal Forte User

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    Minnesota
    Bruce, you bring up good points.

    Like the variety of horns we have to choose from these days, it seems to me that we have a variety of "schools" of trumpet to choose from.

    I am guessing that I would fit in to one of the schools of thought, but don't have the knowledge, nor the desire to figure out which one it is.

    In retrospect I have been fortunate that the teachers I have had in the past have shown a knack for teaching, and they certainly took the time and effort to invest in me for which I am grateful.

    I can w/out hesitation say that I learned something from all of my trumpet teachers (even if it was what not to do).

    I do realize that due to my minimal time to woodshed that my improvements will be slower than any serious students. I also realize that my level of playing will without a doubt not reach the level of proficiency that I once had. Most importantly, I am having a blast picking up the horn again and listening to the banter back and forth about trumpets, playing and politics in general.
     
  9. cornetguy

    cornetguy Mezzo Forte User

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    Sep 12, 2005
    Saint Paul, MN
    The only reason i can think of is that imo the arbans is better organized. also Gordon's annotations brought the arban to the 20th century while st. jacome was stuck at the beginning of the 20th with the goldman comments.

    i use both all the time. i find they compliment each other, the weakness of one is stronger in the other.
     
  10. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

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    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
    Since we seem to be bouncing about with different exercise and method books (a good topic within itself!) I thought I'd ask about one that I use.

    Anybody have any comments, good OR bad... about the Clodomir 70 Little Studies? I know it's going to take some time to get through it (at least for me!) but I have never heard anyone speak of it... I found my copy "for cheap" on Ebay.
     

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