Amateur considering teaching amateurs!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mamba21500, Jul 7, 2009.

  1. samdaman

    samdaman Pianissimo User

    129
    2
    Jun 15, 2006
    Baltimore, MD
    Alright. I've been watching this get completely out of hand!

    Robin has lots of valid points! What happens if you are starting a kid off on the wrong foot because you yourself haven't had enough lessons or experience teaching or learning how to teach trumpet. People say that you need to be the most experienced and talented to teach high levels of trumpet, but there is also a lot, if not more, talent needed to teach beginners.

    Speaking for myself, I only started teaching private lessons to elementary school kids when I was a junior in high school. This was after COUNTLESS HOURS of practice, taking 8 years of private lessons from two different teachers, and finding out I wanted to become a music education major. If you feel you just need the money and that's why you want to teach, you shouldn't. If you feel you are qualified and you have a clue on what your pedagogical approach should be, then go ahead a try teaching. You may not find that teaching is your thing. It is tough, if done right. Just like playing the trumpet it's tough, but the masters make it look easy. People that think then can play a double C like Maynard with half an hour of practice will probably think they can teach like Thibaud after giving two lessons.

    P.S.- If you don't know what the word Pedagogy is... you probably shouldn't give lessons, but take lessons.

    P.P.S.- If you haven't heard of Pierre Thibaud.... you probably shouldn't give lessons, but practice some of his ideas.

    P.P.P.S- My .02 cents
     
  2. Mamba21500

    Mamba21500 Piano User

    317
    13
    Feb 26, 2009
    Maybe people if he could put across his points without trying to make others points seem permanently wrong...

    If you started teaching as a junior (which I assume is the first 3 years of high school), and after 8 years of playing, then you can't argue with me starting in September as a senior (if my assumption is correct), after 9 years of playing an truth be told a countable amount of practice, I have a feeling that it would be somewhere in the thousands of hours.

    I want to work because I need the money, I want to teach because when I have taught before I enjoyed it.

    P.S Pedagogy- The art of teaching.

    P.P.S Thibaud- Virtuoso and teacher, died at the age of 75.

    P.P.P.S 0.2 cents, a fifth of a cent, pretty much what I'd value some people on this forum at.
     
  3. MTROSTER

    MTROSTER Piano User

    424
    24
    Jan 25, 2007
    Canada
    Mamba-to put it bluntly you are not qualified to teach at this point. You have little experience and have the potential to do great harm to some naive trusting soul who puts his/her musical training in your hands. Have a conscience lad.
     
  4. miles71

    miles71 Mezzo Piano User

    656
    14
    Nov 8, 2004
    Maryland
    I have also been watching this post and feel I can contribute. I teach 14 - 18 year olds as my day job as a High School Band Director. I have some All State kids and some who are planning to be music majors in college. I WOULD NOT trust any of them to give private lessons on their own. It has nothing to do with their ability as a player or their musical talent, they are NOT experienced enough to do it yet. Teaching young students is very rewarding but also very treacherous. You make a mistake with them and they can be set way behind.

    There is a lot to be said of an Education Degree in Music. I am constantly getting new students sent to me so I can fix what someone else allowed to happen. At the 8th grade age of 13 or 14 you don't have the background to teach lessons, especially for money.

    I hope this did not come across to harsh, and I understand your desire to have some money in your pocket. But go out and work to earn some money another way and try to gain the experience you will need to become a competent teacher. PLay in a community band or look for gigs to get some experience.

    Hope this helped, sometimes reality is blunt.
    TD
     
  5. Mamba21500

    Mamba21500 Piano User

    317
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    Feb 26, 2009
    Meh, reality is what it is.

    I'm already in some bands, I'm doing my 50th gig this saturday!

    I think I'll go and clean some windows, you can't go wrong with windows, although there'll be someone that'll stop me :'(
     
  6. miles71

    miles71 Mezzo Piano User

    656
    14
    Nov 8, 2004
    Maryland
    Best of luck Mamba. I hope you don't get discouraged and instead become encouraged to gain the tools you will need to be successful.

    Maybe we can make a Confucius like saying out of all this like
    "Once you have cleaned the windows of your future you will see it much more clearly" :-)

    TD
     
  7. Mamba21500

    Mamba21500 Piano User

    317
    13
    Feb 26, 2009
    Cheers Miles, if only everybody were like you :)
     
  8. Mamba21500

    Mamba21500 Piano User

    317
    13
    Feb 26, 2009
    Okay, mods, you can have your way now, delete the post if you want.
     
  9. samdaman

    samdaman Pianissimo User

    129
    2
    Jun 15, 2006
    Baltimore, MD
    Mamba: I also think your reading what you have to say, there are things that can get you ready to become a better teacher too. Practice--> given. Learn the standard repertoire-->Given. Another thing you can do is look up David Hickman's Book about trumpet pedagogy:

    Hickman Music Editions:

    If you are really serious about teaching trumpet, this is a must have book! It takes many trumpet players brains and ideas into one book.

    Best of luck to yah, bud. Don't knock the handy man gig either. Your future wife will thank you for it! ;-) Peace.
     
  10. simonstl

    simonstl Pianissimo User

    129
    2
    Nov 25, 2008
    Dryden/Ithaca, NY
    Amateurs teaching amateurs is a great idea in a lot of fields...

    just not trumpet!

    If for some reason you learned in a program that spent a lot of time explaining what your embouchure is, how it works, and how to explain it to others, you might be able to teach beginners without causing too much trouble.

    Unfortunately, that's not very likely, given the way most people seem to teach trumpet. The focus early on is on creating players, not communicators, and there doesn't even seem to be a great vocabulary for describing what we do. It's a hard problem to fix.

    There are things you could teach, though - reading music, for example, or exercises for breathing and chops that don't touch a trumpet. Kind of a "pre-trumpet" program. My guess is that you'd have a hard time getting people interested in doing that, though.

    Good luck!
     

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