Amrein trumpets

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by gsmonks, Feb 29, 2016.

  1. gsmonks

    gsmonks Piano User

    Has anyone here tried the Amrein trumpets, especially the Eb rotary?
     
  2. rettepnoj

    rettepnoj Fortissimo User

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    I have NOT tried their rotary horns, but I own an Amrein flugel and have tested an Amrein Bb. They use Bauerfeind valves and are of excellent build quality. Real German handcraf! The sound is really juicy with a lot of overtones, great core to the sound and very good and easy intonation! :-)
     
  3. gsmonks

    gsmonks Piano User

    Kewl! Do they use Perinet valves or Berliner pistons in their flugels? (Perinets jog up and down between valves, Berliners go straight through). Flugelhorns are odd that way- both types of valves are used.
     
  4. rettepnoj

    rettepnoj Fortissimo User

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    Perinet :-)

    [​IMG]
     
  5. gsmonks

    gsmonks Piano User

  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I have been to his shop on several occasions. His trumpets are generally top quality. I once tried a rotary C there and still kick myself in the ass for not having purchased it on the spot!

    Mr. Amrein personally has a very strong "attitude" that is not everyones cup of tea. I love it! He knows what he is doing and why.
     
  7. gsmonks

    gsmonks Piano User

    I like curmudgeons. They generally know what they're about.

    Many of the high-end European horns are priced in the nosebleed range. The Melton-Meinl-Weston F contra-alto I'm looking at is around $10,000 US. Quite a bit more if you go for all the extras. The Thein horns are pricey too. I'm looking at their F contra-altos too. Same with Egger and other makes.

    Yes, the high-end rotary trumpets are sweet, aren't they? Most of them, you can't overblow. They're "the gift that keeps on giving", as I've heard some guys say.

    North American guys don't like the look of the rotary-valve horns, for some reason. I put it down to the fact that they didn't grow up seeing them in orchestras.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I don't share most of these these sentiments. Top rotaries (Dowids, Weimann, Monke, Lechner, Kuhn) here cost no more than a good Xeno. I have played many Thein instruments, but never found one that said "buy me".

    There is no problem with overblowing a rotary. The same reasons apply: lack of musical taste, lack of chop control! The current generation of popular rotary trumpets without a garland on the bell sound very similar to their Perinet cousins.

    Rotaries are very popular with north american symphonic trumpet players-for romantic german music-where they belong.

    Don't get me wrong, I really like the sound of a rotary trumpet and I use them for many reasons, none of which you mentioned. I like the fact that the tone color is more between A and E whereas the piston trumpets are more between O and U. I like the fact that the tone is different in various registers -sonorous in the low register, clear in the mids and brilliant in the upper register compared to the consistent tone of the american trumpet.

    I do not like mixed trumpet sections. I do not like modern french music with rotary instruments, I do not like Pictures at an Exhibition or An American in Paris on a rotary trumpet. I like Wagner, Brahms, Strauss, Bruckner, Schubert, Schumann with the rotary.

    There is no magic with a rotary horn. It is simply another tool that we have to learn to augment our palette of colors.
     
  9. gsmonks

    gsmonks Piano User

    Heh- we'll have to agree to disagree. I like mixed brass sections very much because you can hear the distinct, separate voices. I can't stand the sound of matched brass because the sound, to me, is like mush.

    What you say about American and European horns having sameness and variability reminds me of the old straight-strung pianos, before the cross-strung variety. Cross-strung pianos sound the same from bottom to top, whereas straight-strung pianos have characteristic sounds throughout their range. I have one straight-strung piano in my collection, plus the harp from another antique straight-strung piano, that will one day be used to build a second. With certain composers who wrote for them, the music suddenly comes to life.

    My favourite trumpet has always been the contra-alto. I have an antique Stowasser, a real one, not a knock-off, that just does it for me in terms of 19th century music. It has been rebuilt twice, and the reason I'm looking at a new one is that it really needs to be restored one last time and retired. Where it kicks ass is places such as the opening unison in Carmen. Bb's sound awful playing that passage. Von Suppe, Verdi, do better with a more old-fashioned brass sound.
     
  10. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    I'll bet you do not like green eggs and ham, either. :-P


    Uh. . . I think that's called "blending", a fairly standard musical aesthetic, no? :huh:
     

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