An Holistic Approach to Stuck Slides

Discussion in 'Trumpet Repair and Modification' started by trumpetsplus, Oct 31, 2014.

  1. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    Any bearing surface needs lubrication. Some lubricants last longer than others. Contamination occurs regardless. The challenge is to extend maintenance intervals for maximum effectiveness with minimum effort. The systems in use in brass instruments work well when not neglected, and synthetic lubricants help keep the mechanisms trouble-free for a longer period of time than conventional products do. The same result of neglect affects devices with moving parts, whether they are trumpets or automobiles. Dry lubricants seem to work particularly well, firearms and chain-driven devices being a couple of examples that come to mind. How well dry lubricants would work with trumpets, since part of the requirement is not just lubrication, but sealing as well, I don't know. I would think that tolerances would be crucial.

    As for instrument design, evolution, exemplified by the use of computers has improved musical instruments, has worked quite well so far. Revolutionary change has already occurred; just listen to the electronic sounds being synthesized today. You don't need a trumpet player, or even a trumpet to get an authentic sound these days! Personally, as far as brass instrument design goes, I say: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it!".
     
  2. Dviglis

    Dviglis Mezzo Piano User

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    That "an" in the beginning of the title is really bugging me!
     
  3. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Put it down to the anal English teacher I had in New Zealand
     
  4. johnande

    johnande Pianissimo User

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    A fun topic!!! But then there are those of us who just pick up an instrument, play it, and put it back in the case and never ever question its construction until it fails us -- we just think "that's the way it is" and go on about our daily lives. If questions such as these drive some of you to develop a "better way" more power to you -- and may the music industry appreciate and reward your efforts -- but in the meantime I will lubricate, change the oil, and service my ax just like I do my truck!
     
  5. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

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    The development process of the trumpet (and many other instruments) has, by the investments in the status quo of the larger corporations, created a nearly impenetrable paradigm. Marketing investments, technician investments, public acceptance of what is "the norm" adds additional bolstering to that paradigm.

    True development must come from someone outside of the paradigm stockade...an outsider who doesn't have such an investment in the status quo and who can find financial viability on a more niche market. Them just occasionally the general public (slow to start responding) will take note of and wish to emulate some visible artist using the "new" tool. It's a fickle process, but that's what happens. Who might be the paradigm breaker? Someone like Harrelson...

    I, myself, am working on a radical "reinvention" of the acoustic guitar. Will it be everybody's cup of tea? Nope. In the acoustic guitar world THERE you are talking about a set-in-place system harking back to C.F. Martin's early 1800's concept of cross-bracing as the foundation. It is hard to finding backers...though maybe I have recently. I'll see.

    Emulation of that old guitar "guild" paradigm is rock-solid even today, though there are some cracks in that rock wall by outlying boutique "paradigm breaking" individuals not invested in the "system".

    There are some really, REALLY bright folks that contribute to this page. A manufacturer would be wise to peruse these comments and react. Likely will not; however. The investment in the system would be lost...and the vision of the future is far more murky than the past.

    I really enjoy reading these posts.
     
  6. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    I used Vaseline on my slides for over 35 years ---- I have my original trumpet that I got in 5th grade, it has never had a stuck slide in it's whole life, even after spending over 10 years in it's case in a closet.

    I know slides get stuck --- mine never have that's all --------- ((( by the way, I do NOT own a Getzen --- and my student trumpet was/is a Conn)) ----- my King Silver Flair 2055T also spent 10 years in a closet next to my student horn ------- all valves, slides to each of them worked fine when I got them out of seclusion -------me just saying, I have NO problems with stuck slides or stuck valves -----
     
  7. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

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    That's OBVIOUSLY because of your constantly spitting out slick witticisms. Slick witticisms are self-lubricative. Of course your slides couldn't stick.
     
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    slick witticisms must have a longevity of over 10 years ---- when the instruments were unwittingly sitting alone in a closet just waiting to get spit on --- ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  9. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

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    I laud him for the correct usage.
     
  10. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

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    I might not call it a "bearing surface" exactly...more like a "seating" or "sealing" surface...and that being the case, maybe having a pair of nylon washer rings annularly on the sliding tube actually performing the sealing, there would be less brass in contact to bond, and the spaces between the sealing rings could be a path for the particular contaminants to go without degrading the movement. I think I see a patent coming...
     

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