An Holistic Approach to Stuck Slides

Discussion in 'Trumpet Repair and Modification' started by trumpetsplus, Oct 31, 2014.

  1. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

    Age:
    68
    3,014
    3,582
    Jun 11, 2006
    South Salem, NY
    Seth, I would be more inclined to look at whether the leading edge of the inner is too sharp.
     
  2. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

    5,331
    4,731
    Aug 7, 2013
    Lagos, Nigeria
    No, I don't have a fleet of micrometers to hand, but there's a bunch of boring circumstantial (or perhaps circumferential) details that led me to discount ovality and misalignment as significant factors.

    By 'magic marker' I imagine you're talking about some DIY substitute for engineers' blue. (sorry, I don't generally do p******g contests on sundays, but I just couldn't resist ;-))

    Not sure about toothpaste. Most of them have a fair whack of rutile in them which can be fairly abrasive. I've been using Peek.
    No idea what's in it but it feels pretty gentle as polishes go. And I do have a lot of patience.

    Proof of the pudding is that the slide is quite a bit better today. It won't yet drop under gravity. But not far off.
     
  3. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

    5,331
    4,731
    Aug 7, 2013
    Lagos, Nigeria
    Actually, the edge of the lower inner does feel a bit burry. But it's really thin sheet. Much thinner than the Yamaha part.
     
  4. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

    Age:
    68
    3,014
    3,582
    Jun 11, 2006
    South Salem, NY
    I would still smooth it off - get something like one of your famous wine corks and push it on to the inner so the inner cuts a shallow ring in the cork. Then apply something mild like toothpaste or pumice hand cleaner and spin the cork over the end of the inner to deburr especially the outer edge.
     
  5. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

    7,070
    4,660
    Jan 30, 2009
    Melbourne Australia
    I feel we are getting into the realms of the "Real Tech's Magic Tips" - some Knowledge Nugget that will be coverted by TM members.

    Thanks for sharing Ivan.
     
  6. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

    2,107
    1,091
    Aug 2, 2010
    North Carolina
     
  7. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

    2,989
    2,323
    Mar 16, 2011
    Well, the cat's out of the bag... Machinist's blue and its poor cousin, Magic Marker, are good ways to highlight friction points. Sometimes additional polishing is required to remove traces of the stain after chemical means have been used. Crocus cloth would be the first way I would polish burrs. If that wasn't enough, 1000 grit wet-or-dry sandpaper would be next, followed by crocus cloth again, and so on with progressively more abrasive paper. A requirement for working on instruments is an innate mechanical ability/sympathy without which one courts problems. You seem unsure whether you possess this gene, which is why I was conservative in my previous comment to you. It looks like you are on your way to correcting the problem, to which I say GOOD!
     
  8. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

    5,331
    4,731
    Aug 7, 2013
    Lagos, Nigeria
    Believe me, there are few people who have as strong an admiration for the abilities of a true craftsman than myself. I've just had a rant on this very subject on another thread.

    But perhaps I should own up to now knowing that a medium shank trombone mouthpiece is quite a useful tool if you've just had a clumsy slip working on the end of a thin gauge inner leg ;-)
     
  9. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

    2,107
    1,091
    Aug 2, 2010
    North Carolina
    One of the better uses for a trombone mouthpiece...
     

Share This Page