An introduction and support request

Discussion in 'Horns' started by thehouseofshawn, Jun 23, 2004.

  1. thehouseofshawn

    thehouseofshawn New Friend

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    Jun 23, 2004
    Liberty, Missouri
    Hello all,
    Other than providing some of the SQL and .php information on the board, aside from one productive post; I would like to introduce myself and ask of a few suggestions for my baby.
    I got a Bach Strad 43 that I finally talked my parents into helping me get. It's such a beauty, and I'm very eager to learn, but I've come across a few stumbles...however...I was wanting to know...what are some of the basic things that it seems like everyone gets when they 'get serious' about trumpet? I've been playing 6 years in school, and have discovered what it's like when I approach it like my guitar stuff (something I've always been into), therefore...a short explanation to my being here and why.
     
  2. Still Trying

    Still Trying Pianissimo User

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    Nov 23, 2003
    Lake Jackson, TX USA
    I think the most important thing to acquire is a first rate teacher. After that follow your teacher's advice as to what you should acquire and when. Helpful as advice from different posters may be on TM, nothing can take the place or help your cause more and faster than a well qualified instructor.
     
  3. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    Shawn,

    It sounds to me like you are asking a question about basic things/gear that trumpet players should have, and maybe some other things too.

    Ok, here's my list of things that as a trumpet player, you should probably have:

    1.) Snake - you NEED to clean your baby from time to time and you need a snake to do this.
    2.) Mouthpiece brush - same thing. A dirty mouthpiece can only hinder your playing.
    3.) Method books - Arbans, the basic conservatory approach and it has TONS of great stuff in it to work from. Clarke Technical studies - this is a great book to work from slowly and systematically. Herring etudes - again, work slowly and consistently and focus on playing lyrically.
    4.) Mutes - It sounds like you are in High School so I'm going to give you the basic list:
    Straight - Nothing fancy, but make sure that you at least get an aluminum mute - my two favorites are the Tom Crown and the aluminum Vacchiano that I think is made by Stonelined.
    Cup - Here, you can pretty much get away with a basic Stonelined cup mute - it's what I use.
    Harmon - If you play jazz at all, you are eventually going to need a harmon mute - in my opinion, Jo Ral makes the best harmon mute, but I once bought a scratch-n-dent Emo harmon mute for a song that is dynamite.
    Plunger - again, nothing fancy - go to your local hardware store and buy a cheap, small plunger and use that. Mine cost $1.25
    Those are the basic mutes that I have. I also have a bucket mute, but I find that I use my straight and cup mutes the most out of all of them.
    5.) Decent Valve Oil - It's always good to have a bottle that you are using and one in reserve, just in case you lose one for whatever reason. Al Cass was my longtime favorite valve oil until recently when I started using Zaja Blue Pro Oil.

    That's the basic list of things that I would start to accumulate if I were you. Of course there are other things too, such as getting a decent metronome/tuner, and if you are into keeping your horn shiney, I recommend using Wrights silver cream. It's non-abrasive, easy to use and keeps your horn looking good. I wouldn't even go out on a mouthpiece safari as long as you have a moderately sized Bach mouthpiece (3C - 7C) to work with.

    Of course, a good teacher can only help, but if you are going to be doing a fair amount of ensemble playing, you are going to want to acquire some of that other stuff too.

    Everyone, feel free to add to or edit my list if you disagree.
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Baltimore/DC
    Just keep in ming that many of the posters here on the TM ARE first-rate, qualified instructors, and many, such as myself, have just been around the block a few times and gig regularly, so we know from experience, what you do need, what you don't need, roadblocks to avoid, and things to do that might get you there a little bit quicker.

    I have always believed that as long as you can really open up your ears and listen, that you can teach yourself a trememdous amount without the aid of a teacher. I am for the most part self-taught - most of what I learned, I know from the Gigging School of Hard Knocks. It's probably not the best or quickest method of getting there, but it does work! :)
     
  5. Still Trying

    Still Trying Pianissimo User

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    Nov 23, 2003
    Lake Jackson, TX USA
    Vacchiano aluminum straight mutes used to be made by Leblanc-at least when I bought mine. It is a very good mute and applicable in nearly all situations calling for a straight mute. I think it would be a good choice.
     
  6. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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    Nov 2, 2003
    Trickg pretty much nailed it but let me say that a tuner and metronome are very important. when ever you practice make sure they are on your stand and "on".
     
  7. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Baltimore/DC
    That's right! In my opinion, there is no better mute for band, quintet or other classical or "legit" applications than the Vacchiano, but in a big band, I prefer the Tom Crown. They just seem to have a little more zip to them, the sound cuts a bit more.
     

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