An observation...any feedback is appreciated!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by silverstar, Nov 13, 2005.

  1. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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    That is exactly the point!

    She was in high school, had she heard world class players? Had she studied with world class players and teachers to work on musically. Had she really started trying to work on that in her own playing?

    Musically has nothing to do with potential, or inate ability, it a skill that can be developed.
     
  2. hose

    hose Pianissimo User

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    I am sure we will continue to disagree :-) ......Your HS girl example is good. What if she had a desire to continue to play and study. Her package could have opened a few years later. Possibly in a college music school? {In fact, I think she did continue her flute and is now with the Boston Symphony. Oh, sorry, I got carried away in a little fantasy there. :D }

    I remember my first year as a music major and how I hated to attend the required classical concerts. Upon returning the next year, I was amazed that over the summer while washing cars, I had evidently acquired a healthy appreciation for classical music! I think that my change in taste is a minute example of what I am talking about in this mental attitude of allowing ourselves to develop skills if we let things happen and avoid obstacles. It is not nesessarily a conscious effort.

    I think you know what I am saying...you just are not in agreement that it is relevant. Fair enough.
     
  3. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Actually, she was at one piano student of a very good friend of mine, who is currently a world class classical organist - believe me, the girl just didn't have it - he didn't think so either.

    I'm curious why this has turned into a debate on human potential. According to what you guys are saying, EVERYONE has the inate ability to be world class at whatever. I apologize, but I can't agree with that assessment. Some people have more natural ability than others when it comes to certain tasks and abilities. Can you really teach someone who is tone deaf and sings in a monotone to be an operatic singer? Can you take just any person and with proper training turn them into a concert pianist?

    Take paintings and art for instance. Anyone can learn to push some paint around on a canvas, and most can even learn the basic techniques where shading and lighting are concerned. That doesn't put them on the same level as Monet or Renoir - not even close.

    Again I ask, why would playing an instrument, an act of artistry in motion and sound, be any different?
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Hose, the difference is that you have the inate abilily. That's like Manny coming on here and saying "well, shucks, I worked hard and it paid off" - well, of course it did in hind sight! But what about the people who really desire it and really bust their tail, but they just can't seem to get it? The simple fact is, for some of them, they never will get it - they just don't have the talent, the ability, whatever you want to call it.

    We aren't all born with the same mental potential and anything that you do requires a certain amount of mental ability. Some have brains that can handle the load better than others.

    Is this such a terrible concept?
     
  5. hose

    hose Pianissimo User

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    EVERYONE does not have the potential. There are mental and physical limitations. Some that have mastered the use of their subconscious to do things, thankfully, don't want to be trpt players. Some of them are athletes. But most people have this potential (maybe 80%). We just don't all let it come into our lives.
     
  6. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I think your numbers are a bit high.
     
  7. hose

    hose Pianissimo User

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  8. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I still think your numbers are a bit high.
     
  9. hose

    hose Pianissimo User

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    I really don't know what the numbers are. It probably can't be proven since so many of us will never realize our potential anyway. And that's OK. I am just saying that most of us could do much, much better if we could get the garbage out of our subconscious minds and could zero in on the goal....trpt playing. Kind of like athletes speak of being in "the zone" during a great performance.
     
  10. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I was referring to the 80%.

    I spoke with my wife regarding this subject this evening. As a 15 year veteran school teacher, she is much more qualified than I to speak on the subject. She and I see eye to eye on it, which may not seem like such a big deal, only where I don't have the credentials to back my assertions, she does.

    Lara, sorry we have gotten this so far off of the beaten track. The important thing here is to assess where you want to go with playing trumpet, figure out what it is about playing the horn that makes you happy, and then see if you can reconcile the two.
     

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