Another Audition Failure (Tone)

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by garmeth, Feb 2, 2012.

  1. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Rowuk revealed to me at one point that it's not the amount of air that determines volume, but rather how efficient the resonance (something along those lines, forgive me if I missed something, Rowuk).
    Perhaps you simply aren't using proper air support, and are forcing your lips to do more than necessary, causing a tightness. Rebalancing the ratio of air to muscle work may lead you in the right direction, though this is only a possibility. You should be using a good amount of air at all dynamics, regardless, so more shouldn't necessarily mean louder.
     
  2. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    Everyone here please take note of this statement. Poor Garmeth (like the great majority of young and high school trumpet players) is getting RIPPED OFF by the incompetent MORONS associated with what passes for so-called "Music Education".

    A bright sound is a LIVE SOUND. The tone the incompetent judge was looking for is what we should call a "DEAD tone". One that blends into the music someone else wants to create. A NON TRUMPET PLAYING FOOL wants this dead tone.

    Take it as a badge of honor that you weren't given the top chair. Probably have been best if they'd bumped you altogether. Do not be conned into developing the dead, castrated tone of the sideman or back up stooge.
     
  3. Chuck Cox

    Chuck Cox Forte User

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    Garmeth, use more air to produce more lip vibration for fuller tone. It might get louder than mf....but that's ok. Go for a fuller resonating sound. I don't know how to explain it very well over the internet I guess.
     
  4. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    It's obvious that you've never played in a pro orchestra or you would know better than to make a statement like that. It really doesn't work that way in the real world.

    While there is politics in the music world, pro auditions are done behind screens. That's why they are called blind auditions.

    As far as the OP's sound I would get a second and third opinion. What does your director think of you sound. but keep in mind that there were players whose sound he liked. Do you have a regular trumpet teacher? if not you really need to get with one that can give you feedback about your sound. And I mean a once a week lesson kind of teacher. An experienced, competent TRUMPET teacher-player.
     
  5. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    Hmm. Local, you are assuming that you know what the judge meant when he said "bright" and are superimposing your own definition of "bright" over that. He might have meant "brash" or "piercing" or "strident", or any of several other characteristics that might not be desirable for a concert band principal player to have. Also, regarding your assumption that the judge wants a "dead" tone - he could just as likely be looking for a full, resonant tone with presence. "Dead" is your interpretation.

    Regarding the judge being a "non trumpet playing fool" and an "incompetent moron", if I'm not mistaken, auditions such as garmeth experienced are given by educators who play the instruments they are auditioning. As a school kid, I never played an audition or solo for competition for anyone other than a trumpet player. I'm afraid you are letting your prejudices read more into this than what might be there. Calm down my man. :-)

    @ Chuck: I didn't mean for you to take you list down, man, LOL. I just wanted to be "in" on the significance in case there was something in it for me to learn from.

    @ rowuk: ref Abbie Conant: I can't think of a more despicable treatment and absurd situation. Grumblings under the surface about Carole Dawn Reinhart were unseemly enough, the Sabine Meyer fiasco in Berlin was pathetic, but I guess the good bureaucrats of the Municipality of M√ľnchen, who gave a new definition to the term "harrassment" trumped 'em all.
     
  6. Chuck Cox

    Chuck Cox Forte User

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    I think we could solve this mystery by listening to Garmeth play something. Ah..hem Garmeth ?
     
  7. garmeth

    garmeth New Friend

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    I'm still trying to locate the usb cord that connects my camera to the computer, I should have a video by tomorrow. Hopefully.
     
  8. Darten

    Darten Mezzo Piano User

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    Brash and piercing is what I was thinking..... too bright can also make you sound thin or pinched.
     
  9. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    Kehaulani

    I tend to write with hyperbole at times. Or in the case of poor Gameth's situation: to draw attention to common matters of malfeasance typically associated with music educators. I also find it hard to believe that, shy of him playing some kind of shallow screamer piece that he was playing "too bright". I've seen many a so-called music teacher promote the dead tone. And the result is saddening at least twofold:

    A. They play with a blending tone designed not to project. As if the purpose of a trumpet was to duplicate the clarinet in the lower register

    B. These deadened tone cats play with much timidity.

    Now whether or not this was the case with gameth's judges i don't know. However my complaint is valid in general. IN GENERAL music educators have an inaccurate perception of what a brass player should sound like. And a poor way of teaching the brass player to excel. These teachers commonly push the "make no mistakes, listen to everyone else, don't stick out, blend". Advice that while having some purpose in some conditions is actually detrimental to the advancement of the wind player. Particularly the trumpet.

    But i was fortunate. My early teachers advised me to blow with guts, not cut off the air and PLAY AGGRESSIVELY. And yes i got a low chair in my all district placement as did Gameth. I was however the only cat from these peers who went on to a professional career.

    I've never been hired because a bandleader liked the sound of my Low C (which is a fine tone i believe).

    There are few if any professional concert bands. And even if there were more the trumpets shouldn't strive to blend like French Horns or woodwinds.

    The great majority of permanent gigs go to those who have a bright sound and aren't afraid to project.

    With these thoughts in mind I find the typical all district or all state jurist of wind instrumentalists severely deficient. They promoting a style and sound that is anachronistic. The implicit suggestion to participate as a less driving (translation "less important") musical style. To be some other musicians follower. Instead the trumpet should almost always LEAD!


    That said I appreciate Kehaulani's suggestion (for me) to take a chill pill. I may not do it but it could happen...
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2012
  10. garmeth

    garmeth New Friend

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    Heres the video.

    Lyrical Piece - YouTube


    And to Local 357, I do agree sometimes the band directors don't understand. Recently they handed the jazz band "The Jazz Police" and I was told to "work" on my range to somehow get my decently strong High D up to a consistent double B in two months. I just smiled and nodded, recently the 1st chair trumpeter from university of Illinois came to student teach and he can't really play it either.
     

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