Another C trumpet/Pilczuk question

Discussion in 'Horns' started by trumpeterb, Dec 13, 2004.

  1. trumpeterb

    trumpeterb Pianissimo User

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    Nov 16, 2003
    Pennsylvania
    OK...I have a Bach C trumpet...I believe it was made around 1965 or so. Anyway, I was considering having a Pilczuk pipe put on the horn, as I am searching for ways to improve the response and especially the intonation. Does anyone have any experience with the Pilczuk pipes? Do they work as well as I have heard they do? What are your thoughts?
     
  2. Lawler Bb

    Lawler Bb Piano User

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    Oct 25, 2003
    Milwaukee, WI
  3. tom turner

    tom turner Mezzo Forte User

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    Oct 25, 2003
    Georgia, USA
    Hi,

    I visited Rich Ita and auditioned about six versions of Pilczuk pipes on my Bach Bb . . . and one of 'em ended up making a really fine Bach into a truly great one!

    Yes, I found it true about the intonation. I soon was rarely, if ever, needing to use my slide mechanisms much!

    If Gene Pilczuk had not died we'd probably also have the Pilczuk stepped flare design applied to bell flares too. Gene perfected the leadpipe flares and WAS working ont the bell flare challenge when he died. On the front of his original materials was a custom Yamaha trumpet with a stepped flare bell!

    Ironically, Gene had turned down two mega-bucks offers for manufacturing rights to his revolutionary design in the year before he died (from Yamaha and Bach). Gene wanted to keep the business just him and his son.

    Ironically, after Gene's death, the son lost desire to make the leadpipes without his dad around . . . and eventually sold the rights, the plans, the machinery, existing inventory and the tooling to their friend Rich Ita. It took Rich a few years to get it going again but its a solid idea.

    Who knows what would have happened with that revolutionary idea if either Yamaha or Bach had 'em on all their trumpets today!

    I'll bet a Pilczuk pipe would lock that tuning right in on your Bach C!

    Sincerely,

    Tom Turner
     
  4. trumpeterb

    trumpeterb Pianissimo User

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    Nov 16, 2003
    Pennsylvania
    Tom,

    Thanks for that input. I have heard great things through the grapevine, but it is great to hear from someone that actually has a Pilczuk pipe on their horn. I will have to give Rich a call.
     
  5. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

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    Jun 17, 2004
    Lebanon, TN
    Tom,

    What are you talking about with "Stepped bell flares?" What is the theory behind utilizing them? Is Rich trying to figure the problem out with using them?

    Van
     
  6. tom turner

    tom turner Mezzo Forte User

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    Oct 25, 2003
    Georgia, USA
    Hi Van,

    Mr. Pilczuk died just before the flourishing of the internet and his products were just becoming embraced by the symphonic and professional commercial players when he died. You are too young to remember this period, as are many fine posters on this site.

    Pilczuk was a life-long experimenter who spent over 40 years of his life perfecting his leadpipes . . . and they are special. Late in life he began experimenting with bell flares, expanding them in 13 sections like he did his leadpipes. Alas, he didn't live long enough to make this happen.

    On Gene's gorgeous literature was a photo of his various "pipes" . . . AND a new silver Yamaha trumpet with a stepped flare bell!

    You can see that photo, taken right from the original literature, on Rich Ita's site. You can also read some information about how these unique leadpipes are made too. Here's the link:

    http://www.brassinstrumentworkshop.com/Pilczuk_Pipes/pilczuk_pipes.html

    Sincerely,

    Tom

    PS: Up until about two years ago, one could still occasionally find some of Gene's prototype trumpets selling on eBay, as Gene's son continued to sell stuff that his dad had been working on. Some nice, nice horns too!
     
  7. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

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    Jun 17, 2004
    Lebanon, TN
    Tom,

    I can't seem to find a picture of the bells anywhere, though I can get the idea of what he was trying to do with the diagram shown on that link. Thanks for the information, though.

    Van
     
  8. nieuwguyski

    nieuwguyski Forte User

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    Aug 9, 2004
    Santa Cruz County, CA
    Tom's talking about the small picture at the very top of that page, showing five leadpipes (one appears to be a cornet pipe) below a silver trumpet. That picture is simply too small to show that the bell on the trumpet has steps in it.

    I was in college when my brass instructor came back in the Fall with a Pilczuk brochure he'd picked up over the summer, at a convention (don't know which one it might have been). He said he'd had a chance to try some of the trumpets while there, and that they certainly seemed to have improved intonation. He was less than complimentary of the tone, but his sound concept was dark and orchestral and I could easily imagine his not liking a trumpet with a bright, "commercial" sound.
     

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