another resistance question

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by edcon1981, Dec 18, 2008.

  1. edcon1981

    edcon1981 Mezzo Forte User

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    Does a cornet have more resistance than a trumpet? I just got a '54 ambasador cornet, and i'm playing it for the first time tonight and i'm finding a bit of difficulty in reaching my normal range and maintaining a long tone. this is also my first time in fifteen years of playing that i've played a cornet.

    when playing a song i find myself struggling with hitting higher notes, but when i go over the same song with my ambassador trumpet i have no problem.

    anyone have any clues?
     
  2. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

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    You need to practise more, Ed . . .:cool:
     
  3. Bloomin Untidy Musician

    Bloomin Untidy Musician Piano User

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    You will find it more difficult as far as range goes. The conical bore of the cornet creates LESS resistance, and is a very different blow as a result. In my opinion, i find that the cornet requires more air to fill it. I notice that when i move from cornet to trumpet, that i tend to overcompensate with air.
     
  4. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    What trumpet are you comparing it to? have you had the cornet checked for valve comprssion and alignment. If one of these two things are wrong it will make the cornet harder to blow.
     
  5. edcon1981

    edcon1981 Mezzo Forte User

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    I'm comparing the cornet it to it's younger brother, a '56 Ambassador trumpet.

    professionally checked, no. i trust the gentleman i bought it off of, and as far as i can tell it is perfectly alligned. you get a nice pop from all three valve slides when pulled, nary a whisper of air leakage when the bell is covered, and the valves are of the smoothest action i've ever felt (save a getzen).

    i really think i just need more practice with the horn, that's all.
     
  6. soundgrazer

    soundgrazer Pianissimo User

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    I don't find them all that different but cornets are not as loud, and so, if you are trying to play a cornet like a trumpet you may be forcing yourself. The conical bore on cornets actually makes a lot of things EASIER than trumpets, for example , trilling notes of the same fingering. So, I think you should try different cornets, because like trumpets some respond better than others. Of course, there is also the mouthpiece. If you are alternating between two very different ones this can mess up your chops. Work gradually and give it time.
     
  7. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    How do you know the valves are aligned it doesn't take much being out for it to really affect your playing. have it professionally checked. the pop doesn't tell you anything about the alignment just the compression. the differences you describe are not the normal differences between a trumpet and a cornet
     
  8. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    You know a cornet is supposed to sound sweet and melodic compared to a trumpet. It is also not supposed to be as loud due to it's design. If you are trying to make it play as loud as your trumpet you are probably over blowing. Think about it??? Kids used to start ont he cornet because it is easier to learn on then at some point they would progress to the trumpet. Even today half of my son's "trumpet section" is cornet's? They are also more compact and have a better center of gravity for a kid. So I donot think their is a serious difference inthe amount of blow required only that you are trying to play it like a trumpet? Now if you went from trumpet to Tuba or Euphonium then yes I could see you complaining about the extra blow required. I am also assumeing you are useing the right mouthpiece for the shank size of a cornet???? If not that could be half your problem right their!
     
  9. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    Oh and I while valve alingment is definately a good thing I think too many people make too much about it! It is kind of like putting nitrogen in your car's tires instead of regular atmospheric air. Sure it helps but it is not going to turn your car into a F1 car or Nascar stock car anytime soon! If valve alignment was as big of a problem as some make it out to be then every trumpet off an assembly line would be in need of an alignment!! LOL Conn's even have the valces marked so that any joe off the street can get it right. I wounder how they sell a valve alignment to a Conn owner??? Seeing how they have to use cork and felt to get the valves aligned how far off would you have to be to cause a serious issue of blow??? I am not an expert like Charlie Melk is in this area that is for sure but I am thinking it would present itself in other ways that are fairly obvious if they where off that much?
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    NO, a cornet does not have more resistance!

    One hears themselves differently and that fools the brain into believing that the blow is stiffer.

    Experiment: take your horn into a room with LIVE acoustics (a big bathroom, church, hallway, cellar.........) then play some simple scales with both horns. Many or most times the cornet will now appear to be even freer blowing. Now go outdoors and try the same thing: the brighter sounding horn (in this case the trumpet) will ALWAYS appear to be easier to play because our ears get less sonic clues from the environment so what comes off of the OUTSIDE of the bell is decisive.

    Dead acoustics favor bright (this is why lighter horns are generally found in the studio), live acoustics give us more leeway to play with our sound!

    Mathematically speaking, the more conical shape of the cornet should not slot quite as well as the more cylindrical trumpet. This means LESS resistance for the cornet as slots are resistive.
     

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