Another vibrato thread...

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by butxifxnot, Jul 4, 2005.

Which is better?

  1. Diaphragm vibrato

    100.0%
  2. Embouchure vibrato

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. Shaking the thing

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. butxifxnot

    butxifxnot Pianissimo User

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    Which is better? Why?
    [edit]Don't be offended. I use embouchure vibrado. I find I have good control of the vibrato that way. I do tend to make it wide, however. Appreciate the input.
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    There is no such thing as diaphragmatic vibrato.

    We blow out to make a musical sound on a trumpet. The diaphragm's primary use is to haul air into the lungs. When you blow out it no longer contracts. Rather, it rests and ascends to it's pre-inspiratory position until you inhale again.

    The abdominal wall would have to contract and relax at such a rapid rate that a vibrato would be almost impossible at a subconscious level and the subsequent tension would reduce any quality of sound to nothing worth hearing.

    That leaves you with only the other two choices unless you separate the miniscule movement of the tongue from the embouchure.

    ML
     
  3. butxifxnot

    butxifxnot Pianissimo User

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    My private instructor used it that way. Diaphragmatic vib as in the kind of vibrado flutists use. They can only use said vibrato in that they make the air-stream go "hoo-oo-oo" to make the vibrato. My Ph.D of a trumpet instructor said that this is preferrable, though he uses his embouchure.

    Also, how can I avoid being wide in my vibrato while still getting the point across in the playing?

    Thank you for the input.
     
  4. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    Manny Laureano wrote:
    Thanks Manny, a pet peeve of mine too.

    Especially when I hear choir directors demanding that people use their diaphragm to support their tones.

    -cw-
     
  5. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    When the hand vibrato is done properly, the horn does not shake. I have always used the hand vibrato. You can instantly turn it on or off. You can go from an almost Louis Armstrong kind of sound, almost playing shakes, to a very cool, suave sound like Gil Johnson's.
    Only the fingertips oscillate gently on the valves. I think of making the o.k. sign and waving goodbye. Watch violinists vibrate, they are most times good examples of vibrato.
    Wilmer
     
  6. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    Wilmer wrote:

    Ditto Harry James.

    Watch videos of Harry playing. He would play the fast schmaltzy vibrato all the way down to a nice slow wide one.
    My dad taught me also to use that type. You can also use it like some of the great vocalists and vary the speed as you're playing. i.e. on a long ending tone gradually increasing the speed as you end the note.

    -cw-
     
  7. butxifxnot

    butxifxnot Pianissimo User

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    That's what I was afraid of. I watch them and think how crazily (my coined word. Like it?) their left hands look while vibrado...-ing (two words in one post. I'm on FIRE). Is that really what you mean, or are you seeing different violinists??
     
  8. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    I don't think you have seen first-rate players. The word I used was gently, not an exaggerated hand gesture. Watch the finest of today's players. I think we are speaking about a different group of players. Gidon Kramer,Itzhak Perlman, Hillary Hahn and Midori are but a few that come to mind.
    Wilmer
     
  9. trumpetmike

    trumpetmike Forte User

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    "which is better?"

    Whichever sounds right for the style and occasion.

    My advice to my students is to learn different ways of producing vibrato (including hand and embouchure (the classic chin wobble, made famous in the British Brass Bands)) then let them use their musicality (under guidance) as to which is most appropriate for the situation they find themselves in.
    For the most part they use embouchure vibrato, as do I.
     

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