.Any critique? for self taught palyers.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by the newbie, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. Brad-K

    Brad-K Piano User

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    Yeah, I remember you talking about that....great deal!
    I checked out Arban's 1 on You Tube....NO WAY am I ready for that! But where my book leaves off, I feel I will be ready, but we'll see.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2012
  2. brad361

    brad361 Pianissimo User

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    Feb 12, 2008
    For some reason, I could not see your video, but could hear it.
    Is it "cool" to talk about never having had lessons? I don't think so. Not just because you have some aspects of your playing (like articulation) that could use improvement, but I think that bragging about never having lessons implies that someone believes that they already "know everything". There are VERY few musicians who are true masters of their instrument / voice, and probably fewer who got there without instruction and encouragement.
    That being said.....only three years, with no instruction, you're off to a very good start. But if you really want to speed your progress, take private lessons. BTW, I'm an "old guy", 57, music degreed, part time professional player and do teach privately (and no, that's not intended as a new student-solicitation!).

    Best of luck!

    Brad361
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2012
  3. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    Newbie, Well lets see. I don't hear or see any really bad habits. Your concept of sound/tone is very undeveloped. If I had to grade it I would put you around at what one of my beginning students sounds like after their first 3 months of playing. A good teacher would make a world of difference.

    As far as going pro, how long to you have. It takes most players 3 to 4 years to each an intermediate level of playing. This corresponds to a high school level of playing. What kind of pro work do you want to do? because without formal training you might be good enough for a rock band. But your competition even in a rock band will be players who have formal training with at least an undergraduate degree. For classical or jazz you will be up against players who have at least a masters degree. And remember players who will make a career with music are practicing around 4 hours or more a day for years.

    Can you do it? yes you can, but realize that it is a profession. When formal training and dedication and perseverance to long range goals you could get there.
     
  4. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    Your mouthpiece position IS NOT A PROBLEM! Please, please don't try and change the mouthpiece position. It IS NOT A PROBLEM!
     
  5. Satchmo Brecker

    Satchmo Brecker Piano User

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    ...oh, and take that hat off! You look like you're trying to look the part of a hip musician. Focus on BEING a musician not acting like one.
     
  6. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    Thank you.
     
  7. the newbie

    the newbie Pianissimo User

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    Hey i love hats! and am NEVER seen without one! Its not for looks, its just me. i have a collection of them. (nothing whatsoever to do with a receding hairline! lol.)
     
  8. the newbie

    the newbie Pianissimo User

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    I guess i want to be in a band where i can write and perform our own songs, kinda like these guys... Of Monsters and Men - Little Talks (Live on KEXP) - YouTube

    also i am not married or have kids so maybe a year or 2 on a cruise ship would be something i would strive for. :)

    But yeah its gonna take a long time to get where i want to be, which kinda makes me sad but also gives me something to aspire to.
     
  9. schleiman

    schleiman Piano User

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    May 12, 2010
    Austin, TX
    I think you should definitely get into a community band if you can. Since I did I've noticed my playing improve quite a bit. Still no where near what I would call "good" but it's a challenge to play as well as some of the other players. So go out there and see if there are any in your area. The thing about being in an ensemble is it gives you something to push for. You have to learn X number of pieces and be able to perform them by X date. Most of the pieces are beyond my technical ability really, but they give me a reason to do the work as far as double and triple tonguing, learning my scales, working on my attack and style. It helps me to have a reason for doing things, sort of puts the work into context. The great thing about a community band is that you aren't getting paid so it's a great place to learn what you are doing wrong. You can also poach people to play with on other days of the week. Maybe one of the seconds or first players would like to come over and work on the music with you? Sectionals are always a good thing. Anyways, rambling. But it's a great idea and you should run with it. So worth it.
     
  10. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    The guys I know who are good enough to get cruise ship gigs are better players than I am, and I've been at it for 40+ years (although I have played a few gigs on cruise ships).
     

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