Any ideas on60's Rock music with horn parts?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by SteveRicks, Nov 20, 2011.

  1. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

    3,444
    1,154
    Aug 15, 2009
    Alabama
    A local rock band has asked me about adding horns (trupt, sax and/or bone) to their band. Most of the non-horn guys play by ear, though I assume they would "read" if something was available. Does anyone have any sources for 60's rock sheet music that includes horn parts? (Guitar cords, words and horn parts). Free would be best, but I would consider buying 3-4 charts to see if it worked with the group. Am looking for typical 60's rock -golden pop station stuff. Any help is appreciated. Thanks.
     
  2. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

    633
    240
    Jul 1, 2011
    We generally use midi formats from various free databases. Then convert to sheet music through some program like Finale.

    The problem encountered when working with most non reading rhythm sections is that you can't exactly tell the guitarist or lead vocalist to "take it from letter D". In his mind there is no letter D.

    So half the time we gotta take it back to the beginning of the tune. A little frustrating. You don't want to go too hard on a good rhythm section though. A sense of animosity often exists between them and the horns. Almost like the Civil War at times though they won't usually speak of it.
     
  3. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

    2,513
    1,291
    May 7, 2011
    Arizona
    I had a horrible experience with this kind of thing when I was in college. I was a strong lead player, and excited to join the band. like you, they were a bunch of garage guys with no charts. They expected me (and the other horns, a sax and bone) to sit in the band on a gig. I was shocked when I got there and there was nothing. No charts, no lead sheets, no set list. The drummer would just call out a tune and then kick it off. About half of them I have never even heard.

    Needless to say, we sucked... but they blamed US, believing that we should just "know the standards" and be able to play in any band.

    Be careful! Garage band guys are very sensitive to being criticized about their musical knowledge by trained musicians. They can't read music, and probably will be defensive when cornered. Someone is going to have to get their set list, AND, what key they do these songs in, then transcribe the horn parts.

    Salsa bands are like this alot too... but at least they cuss at you in Spanish and you never know it.
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,129
    9,306
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    This is your chance to be an arranger. In the 70-80's I arranged for a 3 piece horn section: Blood Sweat & Tears, Chicago, Tower of Power, Memphis Horns (backed up the Doobie Brothers); Brecker Bros. (Some Skunk Funk was a real hit at disco gigs). Did it the old fashion way, ran the lp by me tens of time, then transcribes all the parts off the album, and put it down on paper. It is probably faster doing it this way then going out and looking for so many groups from days gone by. AND it will really give you an education on the use of horns and harmonics. I think my ability to write down the actual rhythm in charts today, came from the skills I developed from transcribing in the past.

    With that said, I'll go through some boxes I have collected over the years here at home. If I can find my charts, I'll let you know, then sell them to you for a fair price.
     
  5. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

    1,189
    84
    Aug 9, 2007
    Levittown , NY
    The horn and rhythm sections can get together and work out riffs for the horns to play,either in unison or harmony.You could then write these down or memorize them.
     
  6. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

    3,463
    2,728
    May 14, 2011
    Hawaian homey
    A source you won't believe: Horn Band Charts
    This source has some horn charts, but his web site is a bit hard to navigate: http://saxsolos.com/
    This is a source I used several years ago and I do not know if it is current or not. I leave it up to you: http://horncharts.freewebspace.com/


    Also, FWIW, I also have mainly done the same thing as Local 357, which is download MIDI files of the songs into a notation program (in my case Sibelius), edit and print horn parts out. It's a lot more complicated than that, but that's the overview of the process. Considering how expensive some music notation software is, unless you plan on using them a lot, it's cheaper to just buy the horn charts. BTW, before you get any charts, make sure they are the same key that the band plays them in. Usually tunes are in the same keys as the original recordings, but the band just might be built around a singer who sings in different keys than the original.

    Regarding playing with pop band players, you are on a two-track system. One as a trained musician the other - and you need to learn quickly if you haven't already done this - as an "ear" pop/jazz musician. The only way I know to overcome the problems mentioned above regarding the pop musicians not knowing where "letter D" is, is to also become one of them. They cannot and will not refer to places on your written music for reference, but they do have their own references and it is your responsibility (read "survivability") to learn what that is. Usually it is simply the terms, "chorus", "verse", or other terms they'll use, as well as just referring to the lyrics, which you should learn. I've worked with singers who will just shout, "to the chorus"! and give you about half a beat to get there . . . and you better be there.

    You might have a number of tunes to get quickly up to speed on, so you will probably need written charts, but once you've got your basic repertory, I would highly recommend that you start transcribing at least the easier songs right off of the recordings. Transcribing is considerably easier now'adays with the Amazing Slow Downer and such software. But the main advantage to the transcription, aside from sharpening your ear, is what we were referring to earlier, and that's in how to learn these tunes in the first place. When you transcribe them, you are internalising the form of the tunes, to some extent the lyrics, and all of the things (except the harmony) that the non-reading players are learning, and it will help you when you are playing with, and importantly, communicating with, them.

    One thing you have to realise. You are in their world.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2011
  7. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

    3,444
    1,154
    Aug 15, 2009
    Alabama
    I appreciate the advice, but am not clear on what you mean by "convert by a program like Finale." By the way-some background - I'm 58, a trained musician, who played into the 70's and then stopped until recently. Though mainly a big band player, back then I often played with rock groups (often Chicago style music). Essentially, I'm hunting 3-4 rock charts (standards) to see what this group can handle. As I have a regular day job that often works me 11-12 hours, I'm not interested in trying to transcribe music. Been there, done that 30 years ago. Anyone have a few PDF's or a source where I might pick up a few charts for minimal cost?
     
  8. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

    3,463
    2,728
    May 14, 2011
    Hawaian homey
    I appreciate the advice, but am not clear on what you mean by "convert by a program like Finale."

    Finale and Sibelius are music notation software programs. What we are talking about is that one can download a MIDI digital file of a song, which has the band parts and vocal part, into your software program (Finale, Sibelius or other similar programs). Then you have to clean it up, which usually means a lot of editing, deleting all but the horn parts, correcting them and checking their harmonies with what the other band players will be playing and then printing the horn parts.

    Essentially, I'm hunting 3-4 rock charts (standards) to see what this group can handle. As I have a regular day job that often works me 11-12 hours, I'm not interested in trying to transcribe music. Been there, done that 30 years ago. Anyone have a few PDF's or a source where I might pick up a few charts for minimal cost?

    Well, there you have it, then. Go to the first web site I posted above and have at it.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2011
  9. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

    3,444
    1,154
    Aug 15, 2009
    Alabama
    kehaulani,

    Thanks. Got tied into reading your post and forgot about the websites listed first.
     
  10. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

    3,463
    2,728
    May 14, 2011
    Hawaian homey
    Sure. Hope it pans out.
     

Share This Page