Any strategies for practicing with very limited time?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Chrisb, Mar 2, 2015.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Yep, I was out waking Emily (the dog is no longer in the bag) and slipped on a stretch of un-attended side walk that was a solid sheet of ice camouflaged by a fresh snow flurry pack. Landed right on my left hip and am on blood thinners. I was scared for a bit and hobbled home but noticed no swelling or bruising in the hip. Actually, playing the horn for those couple days of painful recovery helped keep my mind of the pain. So you can look at trumpet practicing as a form of anesthesia.
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Moreso, just desperation to do something I still can do and enjoy. Just staying out of the cotton fields when it begins to bloom and they spray to arrest its growth. Not very favorable to my COPD affliction.
     
  3. Chrisb

    Chrisb Pianissimo User

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    Bite your tongue :lol:.

    Thank you everyone for your help, suggestions, and inspiration. Some great comments here. I think maybe I've been too sensitive/cautious to the needs of my kids for sleeping and that soft playing, or a practice mute (or the silent brass system) will open up significant practice time for me at night. As Rowuk and Patrick mentioned, absolutely, the intention is not maintenance, but to grow as a musician and player. I always regretted giving up music and don't intend to let it go again - it is just something I love too much. When I hear stories like Ed's and Gmonady, it just goes to show how beneficial music can be to us.

    Rowuk, I have read your comments about the Circle of Breath before and tried to incorporate much of that philosophy. The director of the community band I play with is a proponent of many of the same concepts.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Chris, you now know what we think. Now it is your turn to do something for a couple of months and then review the results. Take notes and come back with your first hand experience. getting better means working on what is weak. Taking notes helps you keep focus!
     
  5. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    still -- you should consult your wife on which instrument she prefers you to play
     
  6. Chrisb

    Chrisb Pianissimo User

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    That is a very good point, to take notes. I think the important thing for me is that while I am doing many of the right things, I need to do more of them, longer and more often. Like everything in life, if it is worthwhile, it takes work. I had a talk with my wife last night and tried some soft playing and while she could hear it upstairs, she felt it shouldn't affect our daughter sleeping. I suggested a practice mute and she thought that was a good idea. She is beginning to understand how important this is to me and is accepting that I will be doing it. It is a good first step.

    I was always told it is better to ask forgiveness, than permission :D. On the other hand though, you may have a point - I saw a subcontrabass recorder suggested on another thread - I wonder how she would feel about that (if I could fit it in the house that is):lol:
     
  7. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Chris - I can see in the previous post that the line of communication is open between you and your wife --- with all my joking aside: that was my main point -- to talk with her - work something out, and in the end (generally speaking) - a wife who knows her husband loves her will usually support him in his musical endeavours -- even if it's a trumpet (((well she at least will tolerate the trumpet noise))) ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    If our practice routine is structured, it is much more tolerable to our surroundings. If the focus is what is good for us, generally the volume of sound drops considerably. We build chops - technical and endurance - not by nailing practice time to the wall, rather with a high number of low impact repetitions. If we are working on good sounding tunes, the general opinion is far more favorable than an hour of Clarke at forte.
     
  9. Robbrand

    Robbrand Piano User

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    I have just unwrapped by Yamaha Silent Brass SB7X (the new model) and I'm blown away. It is so much better than just playing with a normal practice mute. Because of the sound enhancement, you don't have to fight the back pressure. You can safely play at any time of the night without waking up the babies in the next room, and to yourself it sounds like you're in a practice room (or a cathedral, if you use the Reverb 2 option). It's so realistic I had to take my earphones off a few times to make sure I wasn't blasting the neighbourhood to bits!
    Get one, it's worth every penny.
     
  10. Chrisb

    Chrisb Pianissimo User

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    I actually ordered one a while ago, but after almost a month of waiting without a shipment from Yamaha, I got frustrated and cancelled the order. I may reorder again sometime, but, on the plus side, the practice regimen has gotten much better. I now manage at least 45 min every day, and often more. A combination of my family being gradually more understanding, with soft playing and if late, I use my harmon mute with no complaints yet. Thanks again to all for the advice and encouragement.
     

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