Arban's question

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by spirithorn, Mar 9, 2005.

  1. spirithorn

    spirithorn New Friend

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    Mar 3, 2005
    North Carolina
    Hi Manny -
    A couple of quick questions regarding Arban's:
    Do you subscribe to the text suggestion for articulating rhythmic figures of the type eighth - two sixteenths, two eighths? That is, essentially reducing the note values by one half, so the effect is like a short staccato?
    Also, I have read suggestions to ignore (with a few exceptions) the staccato markings in the scale-based exercises and concentrate on smooth air flow.
    Would be interested in your thoughts.
    Thanks, as always.
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Spirit,

    I suppose that for the first part of your suggestion about taking the text literally, I'd have to answer that style is always a consideration. However I thing that the characteristic trumpet sound is always connected to a shorter style rather than longer one. It's esentially a fanfare figure, is it not? So, in that context I'd say play shorter but not to the point where it sounds uncharacteristic and pecking.

    The query about staccato is an interesting one because we can make the mistake of saying that because something is short that it can't flow. I think the best kind of staccato does have a phrasing flow to it and doesn't sound static. Rather, it has plenty of direction and moves the phrase even in an exercise.

    ML
     
  3. spirithorn

    spirithorn New Friend

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    Mar 3, 2005
    North Carolina
    Thanks. The idea of a "phrasing flow' in a staccato passage is a good "sound image" to keep in mind.
    While I realize that this is very subjective, and has to do with the style of a particular passage, I remember picking up somewhere along the line the notion that a basic, "dot" staccato reduces the given note duration by half. So a quarter note played "staccato" would have the duration of an eighth note, an eighth would have the duration of a sixteenth, etc.
     
  4. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
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    Spirit,

    I've never thought of it that way. It depends on what others in the orchestra are doing but I've never been aware of a rule as quantitative as that.

    ML
     
  5. timcates

    timcates Pianissimo User

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    Jan 17, 2004
    Texas - USA
    I've known guys that teach quantitative note lengths for beginners/second year players and have used it myself in large ensemble clinics to get 1st 2nd year player to think about the end of the note and it seemed to work well (i.e. legato=full length, marcato (>)accent=3/4 length, staccatto=1/2 length).

    It's a good jumping off point; but you have to stress that it's not an absolute and the ears guided by experience in listening to many different styles are ultimately the judge for note length because there are simply too many varibles to quantify (paraylsis by analysis, etc.).

    TC
     

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