Arbans

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by anthony, Apr 11, 2012.

  1. anthony

    anthony Mezzo Piano User

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    Hi. I am a comeback player about 3 yrs.maybe 3 and one half now
    When Iam practicing for sight reading practice I sometimes go to the back where
    the characteristic studies are...I find them almost if not impossible to play
    So I go back do the duets and/or exercises .My question is
    when does it get better when will I be able to play "The hard stuff " Thanks Anthony
     
  2. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    After many hours of practice my friend.
     
  3. anthony

    anthony Mezzo Piano User

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    Practice I have to practice ! !
     
  4. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    No, not at all. You MUST practice.


    You will get it soon, I would take it real slow. Slow enough to get every single note cleanly in the right rhythm. You might have to go at 20 BPM. But once you get that, take it up to 30 BPM and so on. The horn will not play itself.

    Best of luck,
    Cody
     
  5. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    The characteristic studies can be overwhelming... but you can use them to help you identify where you need to work n (maybe scales, maybe slurs, maybe intervals, tonguing, whatever...) The characteristic studies are really just pieces to demonstrate the fundamental skills taught in the rest of the book. You should not be able to play the characteristic study if you have not mastered the corresponding fundamentals. Work on the fundamentals to get good at the characteristic study. Use them as a score card to gauge how your fundamental practice is going.


    Use a metronome, start it painfully slow. Nowhere near the performance tempo. Break the study down into logical segments. Do one segment super slow until you can play it right. Then slowly start increasing the tempo. Move on to the next section. Eventually you will have all the sections done and you can stitch them together.

    Remember to play them musically!!
     
  6. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    J.B. Arban says this in my edition of the method in the "Final Observations" that introduce the Characteristic Studies and following pieces (mostly airs with variations):
    "In the eighteen solos, with which I terminate this work, will be found all the difficulties to which I have given the solutions; it now rests with the student to realize them, by diligent practice."

    Pretty self explanatory as to the intent and general principle. However, considering the wealth of work composing the "solutions" to the aforementioned difficulties, a good teacher's guidance makes use of the method most productive.
     
  7. anthony

    anthony Mezzo Piano User

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    Mar 3, 2009
    Thank you all for your advice much appreciated
    Anthony
     
  8. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    I will share this, we have a grading scale for my music. The best is Superior then it goes down from there, Excellent, Good, Fair, and Poor. By getting the right notes and rhythms 100% accurate in the right tempo done perfec, will not get you a superior. You must make music to get the superior, not just play whats on the page. ;-)
     
  9. bach37

    bach37 Pianissimo User

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    Dec 1, 2011
    p42 17-21 will whip you into shape. Also 138 ex35-38 and p162 26,32,33,36. Will all be good for you. You should be able to play all of them. Gives your face a good work out!
     
  10. Satchmo Brecker

    Satchmo Brecker Piano User

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    I'm a comeback player too (from sax), and I'm working the Arbans too (and went thru some other method books too). Love it! One little thing I've learned is this: work the exercises but don't drill yourself into the ground on them. For example an exercise might give a tempo range, like 60bpm - 96bpm. Instead of hammering away at that one exercise until you can hit 96bpm (or set of them in the same section), work them so you get 60bpm down pat. Then maybe 68 or 72. Then move on. THEN...maybe a couple months later comeback to those same exercises and see what happens. My experience has been they're much easier after that time AND I'm ready to bump things up a notch to the faster tempos.
     

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