Are Monette trumpets and mouthpieces really that good?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by bachstradivarius, Sep 13, 2013.

  1. Tjnaples

    Tjnaples Piano User

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  2. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Seen it.
     
  3. Tjnaples

    Tjnaples Piano User

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    Was hoping for some thoughts but that's a start.
     
  4. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Well, for starters, sound concept has to be developed between the ears and then the ears have to be trained. That's the old school method I was taught in the 60's. Pitch training takes time and dedication. A piece of hardware cannot compensate for not having this training.
     
  5. Tjnaples

    Tjnaples Piano User

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    Agreed, I practice using iTabla. Knowing you're in tune to begin with is huge. Being flat sounds worse than sharp to us. Maynard is famous for saying "It's better to be sharp than out of tune" haha.

    I particularly enjoyed the response part of the video. How round the step can be caught my attention the most. Lots of details to then apply to each persons style!
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    To be honest, I do not understand the lack of common sense when talking about anything trumpet. I mean price is never a measure of anything except the degree of lightening the wallet. I have plenty of arguments for and not for a Monette, but nothing lame like 99% worldwide disapproval.

    I have often questioned why the classical wind scene is so conservative. There are no technical reasons for this. I mean the fiddle players do not subject themselves to this type of blindness. Our Jazz brothers for sure take great joy in an "individual" voice as well as blend. Why a well trained classical musician should not be able to accomplish the same is beyond me.

    For the record, showing up with a gold plated Schilke to an orchestra rehearsal creates the same reaction as the gold plated Monette. I guess silver is good enough too........ When will they start to want to pick our husbands/wives too?
     
  7. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    I've heard the same Schilke comments about tuning over and over. It's 100% not true. The player is responsible for tuning, not the trumpet.

    A pro orchestral player once said to me that all the trumpets had to be matched. Changing to a tuning bell was NG even if all the same brand. A different lead pipe was N.G. I think he was being a little full of himself but, he plays for a living and I don't.
     
  8. BigSwingFace

    BigSwingFace Pianissimo User

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    I've heard several Yamaha featured artists (Greg Spence, Mike Vax, Wayne Bergeron, Eric Miyashiro) talk about how they love the Yamaha horns because they play "in tune" for them. Now, obviously they can play in tune on any horn...but I think certain horns are inherently easier to play for some. I think Monette has just tapped into another theory behind pitch centering that makes things easier for some and harder for others.

    And no, the fact those people are all being paid to say great things about Yamaha hasn't been overlooked :)
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    With the exception of Vienna, these days there is a pretty homogenous orchestral trumpet sound worldwide, based primarily on the Bach and Monke sounds. In America especially, the sound has evolved such that an orchestral forte or fortissimo sounds like a mezzo forte. It is loud, to be sure, but without much character. This is considered elegant. With rotary instruments the sound quality changes as one plays louder. A mezzo forte sounds like a forte. The excitement is there, but not the volume. Personally, I like to be able to put a bit of zing in my sound at the right places. My C is darker than my B[SUP]b[/SUP] by choice and my rotary C is pretty lightweight yet darkens up nicely with a heavy mouthpiece with and absolutely sings with my Monette mouthpiece. This way I can meet the expectations of the audience and the conductor while still being me and having fun. While I have Monette mouthpieces for my C and B[SUP]b[/SUP] I really don't like the way they take charge of the sound, but I'm old and set in my ways.
     
  10. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Remember, these are the same sorts that miserably fail the few double blind tests that have been done
    regarding Cryogenic treatment and a couple other scenarios I don't recall at the moment.
    Talk is cheap. Scientific proof is very expensive.
     

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