Arnold Voigt Markneukirchen Rotary

Discussion in 'Vintage Trumpets / Cornets' started by heptoman, Dec 7, 2016.

  1. heptoman

    heptoman New Friend

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    Hey everyone,

    I've been lurking a long time, wow, this is my first post.

    Anyway, last Christmas some of my students gave me a beat up trumpet as a gag gift. But now, I'm wondering if it might actually be a good instrument and worth fixing! It's stamped as "Arnold Voigt Markneukirchen." I know that Arnold Voigt specialized in violins/bows, specifically Stradivarius duplicates, but I can't find any information about Voigt trumpets.

    My local music store tracked someone down in California that said there's no way to find anything out about it, so I'm reaching out to you guys. I also have a buddy in Munich that might be able to ask some of his trumpet friends there, I've already messaged him on FB and waiting for info.

    Long awaited pics: it's in a really bad way, but I've seen worse.
     

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    Last edited: Dec 7, 2016
  2. Niner

    Niner Forte User

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    Check out horn-u-copia. Look in the brand list and see what's there and also in the photo album of instruments under the maker's name. Horn-u-copia
     
  3. OldSchoolEuph

    OldSchoolEuph Mezzo Piano User

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    The construction is typical of Bohemian makers. When the collectives were formed out of the old makers in the East after WWII, they used a lot of the old names as stencils on product - but without regard for what that name had been known for. I admit, it looks older than that, but with the deportation of the ethnically German craftsmen from Czechoslovakia, there was quite a regression in technology when those collectives first started. Another example, that survives today, would be Amati, a name now common on brass, but which was made in string instruments.

    Anyway, that is a guess. It could also be that Voigt's workshop experimented in brass, but I can find no record of it. An expert in old brass fabrication like Robb Stewart could probably date it fairly well while restoring it (by the workmanship observed in dis-assembly), but that would be sinking a lot of money into something that might be a 1946 failure.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2016
  4. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Unfortuntately, one can't read the letters after "Markneukirchen", but they might be "i.S." standing for "im Sudetenland". If that's the case, it would be a post-1938 but before-1945 horn. If it's "in Böhmen" it's pre-1938 (and that's what I expect from the style of lettering in "Arnold Voigt"). The Markneukirchen manufacturers were a pretty closely connected bunch and tended to produce for each other so that every one could offer everything, but did not need to produce everything by themselves.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnold_Voigt
    Information just in indicates that while Arnold Voigt was a luthier and bow-maker of note, other members of his family were into brass. Some of these instruments were marketed under Anold's Name because he was the best-known family member. The family continues to this day and is still making brass instruments, specializing on exact copies of historic trumpets and trombones.
    Startseite - JÜRGEN VOIGT · Meisterwerkstatt für Metallblasinstrumente Inh. Kerstin Voigt
     
  5. Pascalouisiana

    Pascalouisiana Mezzo Piano User

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    This trumpet looks like a priceless sculpture from Picasso.
    Picasso_guitar.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2016
  6. ConnDirectorFan

    ConnDirectorFan Fortissimo User

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    That's exactly what I see..."i. S."...good catch!

    https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B125S8bNnBMTLWRiUzk4dkFJWnc - I [attempted to] trace the "i. S."

     
  7. BrassBandMajor

    BrassBandMajor Fortissimo User

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    That looks like a typical old pre-1930s Czechoslovakian trumpet. Many Czechoslovakian makers were driven out of their homes after the war and settled in Markneukirchen of Saxony. Looks like if it was made in his early years in Markneukirchen. NO big deal of a horn.

    Wouldn't waste money on that horn. You could try self-repairs but could end up badly.
     
  8. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    I disagree. While the general shape is typical for the location and the period, Arnold Voigt was clearly a top-end maker, and this would have been a top-end horn. However, the damage sustained is so great as to make any restoration a labour of love.
     
  9. BrassBandMajor

    BrassBandMajor Fortissimo User

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    In today's world, I wouldn't rate this a top end horn but back then I suppose so. Arnold Voigt was a luthier, born in Markneukirchen. As stated above, possibly a Voigt family relative made the trumpet and sold it by Arnold's name as he shows no history of making brass, only bows and violins.

    Looks like the Voigt family is very musical indeed with many famous instrument makers. Must say it would be an excellent rare horn to have, so +1 for the OP :)

    Certainly would be an interesting horn to hear, when restored.
     
  10. OldSchoolEuph

    OldSchoolEuph Mezzo Piano User

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    Though it might not be anything special musically, if it indeed dates from 1938-45, then it would be a historically significant relic of the annexation, and of the social upheaval within Nazi Europe at the time. This could also be a case of a maker with a socially unacceptable name being forced to stencil one the government mandated - as with the Adolph Sax trumpets of the same period. It could be an interesting research project for someone (with German and Czech lingual proficiency I should imagine though)
     

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