Arpeggios

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by gcast, Nov 3, 2009.

  1. gcast

    gcast New Friend

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    What eos this mean "Arrpegios in the sequence of II V7 I"
     
  2. frankmike

    frankmike Piano User

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    II-V-I is a cadence, very widely used , in jazz too in particular in bebop

    So it probnly means playing tones that are in theat sequence. For example II-V-I could be Cmin F7 bBMaj7, and the scale for playing that sequence could be C dorian mode, that consists of C,D,bE,F,G,A,bB
     
  3. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    C-7 FDom7 Bbmaj7
    (C,Eb,G,Bb) (F,A,C,Eb) (Bb,D,F,A)

    Arpeggio = broken chord
     
  4. gcast

    gcast New Friend

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    Thanks Markie, so if the requirement is to play in 3 keys, do the notes you listed above satisfy the 3 keys or is it just one set?
     
  5. frankmike

    frankmike Piano User

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    my advice was better, his advice is narrow, try mine.

    Also its not only those 3 chords, it goes in circle

    Cmin, F7, bBMaj7, bE7sus4, Adim7, D7, Gmin7, Cmin....

    sa you se it is II-V-I all over, if you start with F it is II-V-I also, also if you start with D7, or what ever other note from G-min/bB-maj scale/C-dorian mode
     
  6. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Gcast asks:
    so if the requirement is to play in 3 keys, do the notes you listed above satisfy the 3 keys or is it just one set?
    ---------------------
    Great question!
    The three chords:
    ii ..................V7.............I
    C-7,..............FDom7,......Bbmaj7
    (C,Eb,G,Bb)...(F,A,C,Eb)....(Bb,D,F,A)
    These are the notes you would play for this particular ii V7 I(there are 12 different ii V7 I's). You need to know the chords to your particular ii V7 I.

    -------------------------------------------------------------
    Here's a little theory you might find helpful as the notes from all three chords have a commonality.
    Intrestingly, the scales for the three chords are the same. They just start in different places.
    C-7 = (C), D, (Eb), F, (G), A, (Bb), C
    FDom7 = ............(F), G, (A), Bb, (C), D, (Eb), F
    Bbmaj7 =...........................(Bb), C, (D), Eb, (F), G, (A), Bb
    --------------------
    What do you need to do?:
    Find out what the chords are to your particular ii V7 I and play the notes of the first chord(one note at a time) then do the same thing for the next two chords when they show up.
    ---------------
    Now you see how it the ii, V7, and I have a commonality.
    ---------------
    If you have to improvise, I usually suggest learning the Dom 7 scale and arpeggio.
    Once you learn the Dom7, you can stay with that scale but, start your sequence with the root note for the chord you are in. For example;
    ii V7 I
    C-7, F7, Bbmaj7
    Play the F Dom7(the scale and arpeggio you learned earlier) but start your first note on C
    Then when the chord changes to FDom7 start on F and play the Dom 7 scale or arpeggio
    Finally, at Bbmaj7 start on Bb and play from the Dom7 scale
    ----------
    This is an old trick that (to my knowledge) was popularized by Charlie Parker but I'm sure there were others before him doing this. While this covers a little more than your basic question, it hopefully gives you an idea as to why the ii V7 I progression is so interwovern and how to use a "shortcut" to learn these progressions.
    Good Luck.
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2009
  7. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

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