articulation

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Tarter_trpt8, Jul 7, 2005.

  1. Tarter_trpt8

    Tarter_trpt8 Pianissimo User

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    Jan 17, 2005
    St. Paul, MN
    Manny,

    I'm a bit confused...I took lessons when I lived in Texas with Tom Booth and a guy named Brian Brown who was principle in Dallas that year (2000-2001). They were so picky about hearing the start of the note. They wanted the start of the note or the attack to sound like a "pop" to the note. I'm here at this camp and the teacher here who is also a principle player in an orchestra says that the articualation is an air thing, the tongue doesn't make the "pop." Who is right?? or are they both right in a sense??

    Jeremy
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Jeremy,

    It's two schools of playing... the pop was very big in Vince Cichowicz's studio although he never referred to it quite that way. He just wanted people to articulate clearly and consistently. David Hickman uses that terminology because it's easy to understand and relate to on an aural, descriptive basis.

    The minimization of the toungue with more air in front is characteristic of Vacchiano's studio and Charlie Schlueter is probably the best-known example of minimal tongue, maximal air. He is still able to play sort notes because he shaves the note from the end rather than accentuate the front of the "attack". He doesn't even like that word to describe the start of the articulated tone. And interestingly, Cichowicz refers to the start of a note as the "release", which is more accurate.

    Not everyone who advocates for a school of playing is an expert, however, and sometimes exaggerations and wrong information gets passed down.

    ML
     
  3. Mzony

    Mzony Pianissimo User

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    Nov 14, 2004
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Hey Manny,
    Cool post. So how do you think of the "attack/release" and how do you like to teach it?
    My memo pad is out... :-)

    Take Care,
    Mike
     
  4. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Different strokes for different notes, Mike.

    I adjust my articulation style to fit the repertoire. Bruckner gets less front than Stravinsky. Berlioz gets a different attack that Debussy. When I played a gig with Mariachi Cobre I knew exactly what they would need from me.

    I base it all on what is going on around me.

    ML
     
  5. Tarter_trpt8

    Tarter_trpt8 Pianissimo User

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    Jan 17, 2005
    St. Paul, MN
    What about on Petroushka??

    Jeremy
     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous Forte User

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    Oct 21, 2003
    Kind of a follow up:

    My old teacher always talked about ending the note with the tongue which places the tongue in a better position to begin the next note. What do you think about this. The only example I can think of is rehearsal #2 of Ravel Piano Concerto in G. The first held G on top of the staff was always cut with the tongue to allow the A to be placed better.

    What do you think about that?
     
  7. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    PBT,

    I'm not sure...

    I'm not sure because that's something that I and other players may do without realizing it on a conscious level and I sure ain't gonna start thinking about it now. Suffice it to say that I've never been an advocate of stopping the tone with the tongue because I have found no musical reasons to do so.

    ML
     

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