Arturo Sandoval at the Dayton Brass Day 2014

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by cyber_shake, Mar 1, 2014.

  1. cyber_shake

    cyber_shake Mezzo Forte User

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    1 MAR 2014

    Enjoyed Brass Day at the University of Dayton (Ohio) today featuring Arturo Sandoval and hanging out with TM-buddies

    10 am / UD Faculty Brass Quintet (Dan Grantham, trumpet; Dave Zeng, trumpet; Aaron Brant, horn; Michael Keener, trombone; Yuki Onitsuka, tuba)

    11 am / Brass Masterclasses / trumpet session led by Dan Grantham: Become A Complete Player

    1-3 pm / Masterclass / Arturo Sandoval and Ed Calle

    3-4 pm / Dayton Jazz Ensemble / Directed by Dr. Willie L. Morris III

    8 pm / Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra featuring Arturo Sandoval

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Arturo started with opening remarks on the importance of being a 'music lover'. We aren't going to work ... but we get to 'play'. He discussed his thankfulness for getting to play music. He demonstrated his home ritual of starting each day sitting at the piano. Later quote included: "Play what you want, not what you can.' Much emphasis was placed upon practice of technical materials for both discipline and proficiency that applies to all playing.

    Next, 2 students demonstrated playing the Arutunian Trumpet Concerto's opening passage and the Stan Kenton Band feature song titled the same as the name of the player, Maynard Ferguson (you should recall that Arturo featured this selection on his critically acclaimed album 'Trumpet Evolution'). Both students showed signs of strength and areas needing attention. Arturo then gave each specific pointers on how to improve their playing and the presentation of each work. I was impressed by the first student's ability to grasp Arturo's suggestions and quickly apply them to the Arutunian. The 2nd student shocked everyone by playing the intro riff to 'MF' with amazing energy and ability (better than the original 1950 recording that I own of the Boss playing it), but couldn't even begin to articulate the slow singing passage that followed. In both cases, I was saddened by the players ability to 'play high' with their 'lead' mouthpieces, only to lack control and quality of sound (or even the ability to even play) in the lower range. Arturo showed that he played on a Bach 1 1/2, mentioned sometimes using a 3C (but nothing smaller), but strongly stated it was a personal thing and that he would never suggest a specific mouthpiece to a student.

    Arturo was gracious to all, and played with total mastery of his instruments ... yes, both trumpet AND piano. I thoroughly enjoy the day and cherished a brief one-on-one discussion with Mr. Sandoval.

    Here are a few short clips from the masterclass:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06T2K6xFT9s&list=UUiU6uVyeKNgTBpM3taszniw&feature=share

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qY-NczonvLk&feature=share&list=UUiU6uVyeKNgTBpM3taszniw&index=1

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGeOva0tioc&list=UUiU6uVyeKNgTBpM3taszniw&feature=share&index=3 Arturo playing a Harrelson hybrid with the UD Jazz Band

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=foQIDeGkM5I&feature=share&list=UUiU6uVyeKNgTBpM3taszniw
    Arturo demonstrates lyric passage of the song 'Maynard Ferguson'

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3_Tzcq_iBeg&list=UUiU6uVyeKNgTBpM3taszniw&feature=share&index=1
    practicing with a metronome
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2014
  2. PINCHUNO

    PINCHUNO Piano User

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    "better than the original 1950 recording that I own of the Boss playing it".
    Really?
     
  3. cyber_shake

    cyber_shake Mezzo Forte User

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    The 'Nati
    if you weren't there, then you've got nothing to say. this kid nailed it and the pitches we're spot on with the last note being as solid as the first ... he was 15 yards in front of me and I've never heard anything louder (including being that close to the Boss for an entire concert in 1978) ... I really was stunned by it ... both in amount of volume (serious air) and control to hit those notes more solidly than anyone I've ever heard.

    I wish I had recorded it ... when he went up front, placed the 'Trumpet Evolution' transcription booklet on the stand and turned to 'MF", Arturo pointed at it, stated, 'you're going to play that?!!!!", waved his hands wildly, then sat down in a chair ... 'okay, then let's hear it'. When he played that first set of calls to begin the song, Arturo's eyes went wide open ... it was an amazing moment.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2014
  4. Kujo20

    Kujo20 Forte User

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    Your mission is to find somebody....anybody that did record it. Because I would LOVE to see it!

    Kujo
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Dayton, Ohio
    I was there, he did, it was. What followed, as Blaine discussed, was a real let-down.
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Dayton, Ohio
    Arturo told of his first impression of Dizzy. He went to a friends place in Cuba so he could play for him this American Jazz. Arturo's first impression (he said) was, "What does this guy Dizzy know?" Playing all those notes, and he still can't find the right one.
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Dayton, Ohio
    Arturo said he started in his local village in a marching band as a flute player. He hated it. Then they gave him the bass drum. Hated it even more. Then he was given the trumpet. He loved it. His teacher thought him the real basics on that horn: Do, ray, me, fa, so, la, te, do. So Arturo asked, but how do you finger a Bb? The teachers answer: Only know Do, ray, me, fa, so, la, te, do.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Dayton, Ohio
    Arturo's first meeting with Dizzy was while Dizzy was disembarking a cruse ship in the Havana Harbor. At the point that Dizzy was only a few feet from him, Arturo wanted to call out to him and ask him so many questions, and it was at that point Arturo realized, "I know no English". He did wave and caught Dizzy's attention. Dizzy asked Arturo, "Do you have a car? I want a tour of Havana?" Arturo nodded yes, and Dizzy came over to him. He placed him in his 1951 Plymouth, that he just "painted" with turpentine and tar, and Dizzy's first words as he opened the driver side door for Dizzy to get in (as the passenger side door was frozen shut) was, "What is that smell?". The whole tour, Arturo spoke little to Dizzy, and did not tell him he was a trumpet player or even a musician. That night, as Arturo was warming up on the trumpet at his band's dance club, Dizzy came into the club and immediately recognized Arturo. Dizzy said, "Hey, what's my drive doing with that trumpet?". Dizzy listened to that band that night and was totally enthralled. On Dizzy's return to the States, he went to his CBS record producer and told them to get that band into New York to Record an album. The producer flew down to Cuba, heard the band, talked to the American and Cuban embassies, and arranged for the band to be flown in to NYC. Off the plain, they were immediately taken by limo to Carnegie Hall where Arturo played his first concert in the USA. The rest as they say, is history.
     
  9. Kujo20

    Kujo20 Forte User

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    Hey Gmonady,

    Have you watched "For Love or Country"? Arturo's story put into a movie...

    If not, check it out. Arturo himself helped with the movie to make it as close to accurate as possible and of course he did the soundtrack.

    Kujo
     
  10. cfkid

    cfkid Pianissimo User

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    Jul 24, 2013
    It really was a great day. I really wish my son would have been brave enough to play for Arturo. He's got a great tone, good control, and a decent range. Not bad for a 12 year old. Arturo was great with the kids. Some of us were warming up when he walked into the room. All of the middle and high school kids stopped playing because they didn't want him to hear. I said "why did you stop playing? This is the man you want to have listen to you." I just kept playing and they joined back in. Talk about reverse stage fright. Wish I had gotten a picture with him, but my son wouldn't go up and do it. Oh well.

    Oh, and we should mention that the concert last night was AMAZING! He had to be hitting triple C's during that show. And I'm pretty sure Ed Calle was double and triple tonguing on tenor sax. Something I've never heard before.

    Mark
     

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