Asked the same question on the TH now I need TM wisdom

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by a marching trumpet, Apr 3, 2010.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,965
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    This is not contrary, it is common sense. Still as a repairman, you have no lobby, no set wage schedule - and due to cheap instruments (and cheap customers) a declining market.

    In Germany, if you want to survive, you must have your masters certificate (Meister), locate where there is business, and do outstanding repairs quickly, for very little money to get started.
     
  2. ca5tr0

    ca5tr0 New Friend

    47
    1
    Feb 28, 2010
    Florida
    RandyTx-

    Your story is what I'm going through at this moment. My passion for music is far greater than I thought it would ever be. The satisfaction I get when I play a phrase 100% correctly is amazing. What I want to be is a Music Major. I can see myself conducting an important orchestra one day. However, I have an AP music theory class right now in high school, and it is so ridiculously difficult, I don't understand much if it. Well I lie. I understand a lot but I can't put it all together. It just doesn't click all at once. My theory teacher says I'm too smart to be a music major??? I don't understand how that can be possible. I find it the most difficult thing I have ever done.

    Music is what fuels me, and I really wish that it wasn't so difficult. I'm scared of failing in what I love. Is that understandable?
     
  3. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

    5,010
    1,802
    Mar 6, 2007
    Ithaca NY
    I would suggest, respectfully, that your theory teacher is more of a hindrance than a help. If you are indeed so smart, then you may be prone to not having to work so hard to learn things, and that can be a pitfall. Some of what you learn in music theory may not be intuitive at this point, but if you are determined that music is YOUR thing, then put forth the extra effort, ask the teacher for extra help, find additional resources, hire a tutor, IOW, do not be daunted. You can learn it if that is your true desire.

    veery
     
  4. RandyTx

    RandyTx Pianissimo User

    97
    6
    Mar 26, 2010
    Central Texas
    A lot of technical subjects (be it music theory, physics, or electrical engineering or anything you haven't seen before really) can have this property of being difficult initially due to what is commonly called a "steep learning curve". What I think it really is though is people learn complex topics differently. Sometimes it's as simple as having it explained a bit differently by two or more different people. One of those people will phrase the important bits just enough differently that the lightbulb will suddenly come on, and you will wonder why you never saw it in the first place.

    It could be a teacher's way of explaining the material. It could be the author(s) of the textbooks involved and the way the explanations are there as well. I've run into this a number of times over the years in various subject areas.

    You're not too stupid for the material obviously, but it is a fairly complex subject initially. It will appear to be hard, until you get a handle on a significant piece of it. Looking back at it a few months or years down the road, you'll be asking yourself "Why did I ever think that was hard again?".

    You might want to try looking at some alternative textbooks. (I've found that a lot of modern textbooks used by my kids are filled with lots of very fancy (and page-filling) graphics, pictures of seemingly unrelated things, and a lot of gibberish to fill page counts up, but not a lot of useful content. Hit a used bookstore or local library for older music theory books. You may find them less visually interesting, but that they contain a lot more useful, and well-done explanations inside. You might also try talking to some professional musicians in your area. It might be that 20 minutes with someone with a slightly different take on the particular problem areas will give you a different view completely.

    In the end, the old adage "nothing worth doing is easy" comes in. It'll be a difficult path for a while, but

    "talent" = time, effort and experience​

    rather than thinking you should be magically born with some innate ability.

    "Too smart to be a music major" sounds a lot like what I was told about your age, when everyone told me I should go off and be an engineer instead. Apparently a lot of people think if you are capable of doing something else, music isn't "worthy" of your energy. This was what I was describing earlier in the thread. Invariably, this is because of a perception of financial rewards down the road being higher for a lot of other fields.

    So the big question you have to settle in the next few years is, do you want this career badly enough to forego potential big stacks of cash from other jobs or not? It's a tough decision, and you could easily argue that the pity of it is that at your age, you haven't seen enough of the real adult working world to have a good shot at really knowing what you love and want to do long-term. If only we had an 80 year old's perspective at age 18. Life would be a lot easier.
     
    ca5tr0 likes this.
  5. ca5tr0

    ca5tr0 New Friend

    47
    1
    Feb 28, 2010
    Florida
    I see what you're saying.
    I love music, but I feel perhaps, with there being music prodigies out there, that I will not have much success. There again the fear of failure.
    What my teacher/ director meant was that I was too smart in the sense that I'm am the kind to question what lead the founders of the music rules to figure things the way they did, and that I would be unhappy with the answers.

    I really appreciate the advice, it's nice to know I'm not the only one who has or is going through this dilemma.
     
  6. RandyTx

    RandyTx Pianissimo User

    97
    6
    Mar 26, 2010
    Central Texas
    One thing you'll run into over time is, some of the solutions in various fields from the past really do look like they could be improved on with a modern set of eyes. But, there is so much usage of the "old way" in practice that it'll never likely change. Other times, you'll find that the "old way" really was quite brilliant. Attempts to improve on them often fail, even with computers, and research budgets, etc.

    As far as being afraid of failure, that's something that you have to get over. A lot of really bright people don't actually succeed because they try to be too perfect, and perceive anything not just right as worse than not trying. It's a mental block that can be overcome.

    Perhaps a few famous quotes pertaining to the subject will be of help here.

    “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” –Thomas Edison

    “Experience is simply the name we give our mistakes” —Oscar Wilde

    “Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgment that something else is more important than fear.” –Ambrose Redmoon
     
  7. ca5tr0

    ca5tr0 New Friend

    47
    1
    Feb 28, 2010
    Florida
    I see. The old way IS usually best. I my self am the old school type of guy. I try to look back onto history to figure things, cause history repeats itself.
    Yeah, the fear of failure is present and I am trying to work on that. My director has been a huge help for my confidence in my abilities and it helps to put the fear of failure to the side. When I suck, he tells me right then and there. If I do a good job he also tells me.

    I just know that I see my future involved with playing. If I were to one day be a conductor, it would truly be a dream come true.

    Thanks a lot for the advice RandyTx
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,965
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Ah, a second trumpet player. ROFL

    The old way is not necessarily the best way, but it is normally useful to have a bit of humility until you have proof that your way is better. Reinventing the wheel is a favorite past time of inexperienced trumpet players.
     

Share This Page