Asymmetric Mouthpiece Trial: Lead and Lead M

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mark_Kindy, Oct 17, 2012.

  1. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    The following is a copy of an email I send to the esteemed Mr. Lynch, creator of Asymmetric Mouthpieces, regarding my trial of this Asymmetric Mouthpieces.
    First, I want to state that I received EXCELLENT service, and as well great feedback and information from Mr. Lynch upon communications with him, by phone and email.

    Here now is the email:




    Mr. Lynch,


    Thank you for your quick response and shipping! I'm sorry I haven't replied to you sooner, been swamped.
    I just received the mouthpieces yesterday, and began trying them last night during jazz band. I figured this wouldn't be too bad, considering I'm on 2nd trumpet.
    I decided to take time on the Lead M, while my friend Sean, our lead player, is going to take some time on the regular Lead. Here are my experiences:


    Upon my initial attempt, I found it interesting to play on, though I had no trouble producing a tone. However, the "lead" aspect of both mouthpieces had not yet clicked with me (I was producing about the same range as on a 3C, about high D-E). I thought,"Perhaps jazz band is not the best time to start trying these mouthpieces," and pulled out my 13a4a to work on. However, I was so curious, and the tone on the mouthpieces was larger than on my Schilke, so I returned to the Lead M again, shortly. With concentration on air, I found my tone centered better and could feel the mouthpiece working better -- things started to click. However, I still found the tone above high C to be a little weak.


    After jazz, I decided to sit down with it, and work. Moving the mouthpiece down, so that even less upper lip was present in the cup, I found that I now had it working as I believe it was intended. The tone was brighter, and above high C much stronger than before. My high G was weaker than on my 13A4A, though it had only been a couple hours, so more remains to be seen. I DID notice that though the inner diameter was much larger than on my Schilke, and the cup portion deeper (so I assume the overall volume to be more than my 13a4a) I did not notice much fatigue, nor as much tightening as my 13A4A required (I was switching back and forth, to compare).


    I will send more details of my progress, and though thus far I am somewhat pleased with the results, I do hope to see more progress over time.


    I did also notice that I could use the mouthpiece with the large rim section on top OR bottom, though for me playing it as a downstream player (with the large rim portion on bottom) allowed for my full range, whereas playing it upstream (with the large portion on top) produced a rounder, "darker" tone, though somewhat reduced my usable range. Neither option required my playing to differ much at all, so I will experiment more with this, because I am curious as to the possibility of "flipping" the mouthpiece orientation to produce different tones.


    I do want to state a critique I have about the lead mouthpieces, however, for your consideration. My friend and I both agreed that the lead mouthpieces might perform better in a smaller inner rim diameter, as we are accustomed to playing on smaller diameter mouthpieces for the style, and this has more of a 3C inner diameter. We feel that perhaps there are some advantages to muscular usage with that. Perhaps a smaller diameter mouthpiece could be experimented with? I would be definitely interested to hear about anything done in this direction.


    To let you know, I'm going to post a copy of this email on TrumpetMaster.com
    You have some proponents of the mouthpiece on there, as well as some curious individuals like myself. I'll keep in touch with both you, and the TrumpetMaster community regarding my trial of your mouthpieces.


    Regards,


    Mark Kindy
     
  2. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    the Asymmetric rocks on, "your high G was weaker?" c'mon my YOUNG friend, put some AIR behind it!! ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  3. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Working on it, KT! It's probably a combination of lips being tired for other things, and air usage not being sufficient
     
  4. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    Melbourne Australia
    Hi Mark,
    You should sit in front of your mate and listen to the tone between his normal lead mpce and the Asymmetric.

    The Asymmetric Lead is bordering on a harsh edge IMO and cuts like a chainsaw. Good lead players would love it, if it suited them. I really think John Lynch has done a great job with those mouthpieces. A smaller diameter will likely make it worse. The 3C-544 gets a little smoother, and the Opera is a warm sound in comparison. They all have the wide, deep inner cup which is part of the endurance factor I am sure. But John can probably explain it better.

    Have you found yourself overshooting the notes above a HighA? That was my findings, and took a while to adjust. This is where I think people think it adds range, I found it did not add range, but made it easier to play the higher notes and play for a longer time. It Took a while to work it out, and I still used to overshoot if I was not warmed up - even after 3 months. Anyway I hope it works out, and I am interested in Mr, Lynch's views.
    Cheers
     
  5. RMS

    RMS Pianissimo User

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    Iowa
    Will be interested in your findings. Have purchased the 3C-544 but haven't received it yet. Looking forward to giving it a try.
     
  6. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    East Yorkshire
    I''ve become a lover of my asymetric. Now it hasn't been a magic mouthpiece giving me huge range increases, I didn't expect it to, although using good practice on it my range is improving more comfortably than it was before. It has given me a good cut to my sound which was very legit before, which was what I had been looking for. What I have found is a greater stablity through my range and greater comfort in my playing. What I will always say is I had a low set of the mouthpiece anyway so I didn't need to make much fo an adjustment to play this. For me I feel I'm not wasting rim area on bits that aren't buzzing on my lower lip. It's also forcing me to concentrate on my airstream more which is never a bad thing. Because my air is pretty good having been a singer I can get a bit blase about it and forget to give it my full attention
     
  7. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    From: John Lynch
    To: Mark Kindy
    Sent: Wednesday, October 17, 2012 2:35 PM
    Subject: Re: Asymmetric mouthpieces

    Hi Mark,
    Thanks for your note.
    The Lead 342 cup ID is a little larger than the 13a4a (a little over 3/4 in. measured horizontally i.e. at the widest point). But when you consider the ID at its largest point, (.5887 in. measured vertically), you can conclude that, for Asymmetrics, the cup ID does not have the same, familiar relevance as a metric to represent some aspect of mouthpiece performance. The 3C-544 has a cup that has about the same "ID" as a Bach-1. This would be a good compromise solution for those players who prefer a smaller cup.

    Cheers,
    John Lynch




    Response:

    Mr. Lynch,

    I didn't fully understand your last message (regarding which mouthpiece had the .5887 inch ID) but I understand your point, I believe.

    More progress today, on the Lead 432M! I noticed that I could play E's and F's above high C with much more ease, felt like my muscles (especially for my corners) hardly had to exert any effort. The tone is also projecting extremely well with edge, while still maintaining a very big sound. I wouldn't say my range has extended as of yet, but if this continues, I fully believe that it will. I still take time on just the Lead 432 M to warm my lips up to it, but it's taking much less time now, which is encouraging. My friend still hasn't had much success, but I suspect (and will confirm tonight) that he hasn't focused on it. I'm going to try to remedy that, since I see very much potential in my playing on these mouthpieces, and can't wait to play on them tonight in jazz! I'll have to compare the 432M to the 432 tonight.

    Cheers,
    Mark
     
  8. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Jul 11, 2010
    Gainesville, FL

    I actually have overshot some, though it felt to me more as "squirrely" at first, rather than giving me range, and I'd still say that my range has not increased. I completely agree with you about it making it easier to play high, and for longer, and I do need time to warm up on it as well. I'm getting rather optimistic about this mouthpiece...one that I wouldn't have EVER tried a few years ago!
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Peter, I get the allusion that you're referring to tonal qualities. These I don't note, but the outer edge of the rim on the Lead 342 I have was so sharp that I found it uncomfortable even after I had it rounded as much as possible. It was leaving rings on my face, and I'm not one to be using excess pressure. If you can't reach notes in the altissimo on other mouthpieces, the Asymmetric will not enable you to do so, but if you can and are accustomed to the lower lip set it seemingly makes it easier and extends my endurance with notes in the altissimo with a regular Bb trumpet ... and then again I find it much easier to play these notes on a piccolo trumpet.
     
  10. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    Yes Ed, I was referring to the tonal qualities. The Opera is my normal go to for any section work, and carry the Lead 342M as a solo mpce that is used to go up above High C for solos, or where I need to cut through the section.

    I was in a Concert Band performance with a guest conductor, who took the band for some critique after we had performed. She wanted the trumpet to really push through, and was surprised to find that that section was only one trumpet (2nd me) playing the part. I changed to the Lead 342M, and she said "Now That's what I am after"... so I carry both but love the 3 of them, as they each have a tone that fits certain groups. I can happily swap between them.

    I agree with you about the sharp edge in the cup on the 342, and the Opera does not have that either. The internal shape and depth is slightly different, but all have a nice wide mouth. You can see here below, the Trumpet mpces are the three in the Centre (L to R) they are Virtuoso, Opera, 3C + 344, 342M, Poet.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2012

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