Attack Position!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Friggin' Nomad, Feb 17, 2013.

  1. Friggin' Nomad

    Friggin' Nomad New Friend

    41
    1
    May 1, 2011
    So I have been relentlessly pounding away at my multi tonguing. I always had problems with the double. And through long hours of practice, I have discovered why. My attack doesn't start correctly. The thing is, that if I first play a note, like a whole note, I can double tongue to France and back after it. But if I try and start double tonguing right off, I'll fall flat on my face. The problem is that my T-tongue is too heavy (I've known about this, but ever really put in any serious effort to fix it). When I play breath attacks, the notes come out fine. It's just my tongue, its like the Hulk. All it wants to do is smash the notes. I know this for a couple of reasons: #1 My triple tongue is fine, because I can attack the first tu heavy and lighten up the second tu before I have to play the ku. But I realized I can't do that with the double tongue; if my first tu is heavy, it will mess me up when I have to immediately switch syllables. Hence why I cannot start a double tongue successfully. Also why I can triple tongue well and not double tongue. And #2 When I start single tonguing faster, it feels different; a lot lighter to be exact. Like I was running on my heels and then switched to my toes (I'm not sure if that is proper running technique, but you get the point). So where do you place your tongue to start an attack? And how do you learn to use less tongue? As in what exercises should I do to clean up my attack and make it lighter and more consistent? I have a lesson on Wednesday, so I'll get the chance to have someone hear what I'm talking about and offer suggestions. But I wanted the general consensus as to how to fix my problem. And also how others fixed this problem if they had it.
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    60
    12,459
    7,035
    Mar 23, 2006
    Parts Unknown
    A clean double-tongue requires relaxation; the only strength required is that for endurance.
     
  3. larry tscharner

    larry tscharner Forte User

    1,466
    657
    Apr 30, 2010
    dubuque iowa
    Right...relaxation. Also the notes need to be even to sound clean. You cant emphasize the tu at the expense of the ku and you are correct in thinking that this is breath more than toung. My experience with double tounging requires me to be sure the tu and ku produce the same buzz and the same note exactly. For what its worth, my toung rotates on an imaginary axis in my mouth that seasaws the tip and back up and down for consistant and even notes. Smooth air flow takes care of the rest. I know...easier said than done, right? Best wishes.
     
  4. Friggin' Nomad

    Friggin' Nomad New Friend

    41
    1
    May 1, 2011
    Okay, so I can get the tu-ku motion. But what is the mechanics for starting a clean attack? I start tonguing as the air hits my lips. I've heard that you're supposed to put your tongue behind your top teeth and ready the air behind it for an attack. So what are the correct attacking mechanics?
     
  5. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    60
    12,459
    7,035
    Mar 23, 2006
    Parts Unknown
    Think of it as a release rather than attack. Yeah, the air proceeds the tongue just as it should every note we play. Try it dry.
     
  6. mgcoleman

    mgcoleman Mezzo Forte User

    721
    474
    Jun 22, 2010
    Iowa
    Since my wife is fond of reminding me that what works for me is not always correct, I won't claim to have the correct mechanics. I can, however, tell you that I start my double tongue attack with my tongue touching the roof of my mouth, about 1/2" behind the upper teeth's gum line.
     
  7. cantplaytrumpet

    cantplaytrumpet Pianissimo User

    96
    19
    Apr 2, 2012
    That's exactly the same for me. I find for me personally that moving the tongue further back softens the attack and further forward is more accented. :)
     
  8. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

    4,470
    4,574
    Jul 5, 2010
    Vienna, Austria, Europe
    Perhaps you might try putting your tongue a bit forward - almost directly behind your teeth. And try and soften the approach to the first note of the double tongueing. There is a very good dry fire exercise for that. It goes dee-ga-da-ga-doo-ga-da-ga, repeated as often as you like. Try to speak that very softly, without changing tongue or lip position! You can do that just about everywhere. Worked very well for me!
     
  9. Friggin' Nomad

    Friggin' Nomad New Friend

    41
    1
    May 1, 2011
    Thanks to everyone for the advice. My attack is getting slowly better... need more practice.
     

Share This Page