audio feedback from trumpet mic

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by crowmadic, Apr 26, 2010.

  1. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,791
    3,552
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    Negative - any sound man worth his salt incorporates compression, gating and limiters into their rack as part of the signal chain. THEN when they "rehearse" their feedback they set the system up so that the attack speed is fast enough to catch it and level the signal before it even becomes a problem.

    I can take my vocal microphone (wireless Shure Beta 87) out to the middle of the dance floor in front of the PA and sing a song because we have everything running through a pair of PreSonus ACP-88 Compressor/Gates.

    Buy PreSonus ACP-88 8-Channel Compressor/Gate | Compressors & Limiters | Musician's Friend

    And to that end, there is a threshold on each and every mic on the stage - I can sing softly into the mic, I can sing loudly into the mic, and I can scream into the mic - everything is picked up and dynamics are heard up to a certain level. At that point the compressor/gate kicks in and levels the signal so that it never rises above a certain point. Gain levels are important, but for our PA the real key to the elimination of feedback are the compressors. Seriously - we never have a feedback problem - it just isn't part of the equation, no matter where the mic is.
     
  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,791
    3,552
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    Just for clarification, I don't think that the method they are using - running a mic into an amp via an XLR to 1/4" adapter is the best way to go about it. But, I also understand needing to do what you have to do in order to make it happen for your situation. Before I got the ART HeadTap which gives me the ability to either plug into the power amp directly, or to daisy chain off of the balanced split on a floor wedge, I was actually putting an SM57 microphone up to my bass player's floor monitor (he and I used the same channel on two separate wedges) in order to get a signal - not ideal by a long shot, but since my sound man made the claim that there was no way he could get me a non-speaker level feed back to my mixer, that's what I had to do.
     
  3. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

    688
    1
    Oct 3, 2006
    At 60+ I find myself in a "Post Rock" band with 3 "musicians" half my age. We just got together. It's like being in a garage-band again. There is talk about getting a PA system, but I don't want to get too financially invested yet. I'm using my own amp for independant volume control, and sound effects. I can preset 2 of the many effects built into the amp, and alter them with a control pedal. Although far from the amp, I do stand in front of it in order to select other effects, and to monitor my volume. I'm going to try a compressor/gate, use an ear piece to monitor myself, stand behind the amp, and look forward to more sophisticated equipment in the future. I could tell you how I got envolved with this band, and what I get out of it musically, but I'll refrain from boring you further. Except to say, one of the perks is the increased contact with younger females!! Thanks to all..........

    crow
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2010
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,791
    3,552
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    That explains quite a bit about what you are doing and why your setup is the way it is.

    I think that the Rolls piece will help to fix the issue. I'm not sure what the overall level of quality is, but again, based on the bit of reading I have done about it, it seems that it was designed specifically with the idea of killing feedback and leveling vocals for a band on a budget. SM58s - the defacto standard vocal mic for most garage bands on a budget, while not as prone to feedback as some other mics, will still feed back, and the Rolls GL 151 is one of those things that would be an affordable alternative if you only wanted to reduce feedback problems in one mic, and it's also small and portable. Most other units are rack mounted units, so they present other problems aside from the higher cost. As I mentioned before, we have two Presonus ACP-88s in one rack, and those bad-boys are $900 apiece. Nice components and very capable, but not exactly what you need.

    I had actually ordered the Rolls product, but since I'm also putting together a home recording studio, based on reviews, I decided to go with a piece that was a bit nicer and had a solid reputation, and I sent the Rolls back, unopened. Not only will the FMR RNC protect my ears with my in-ears rig, but it will be a nice addition for recording in the basement.
     
  5. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

    688
    1
    Oct 3, 2006
    Thanks Patrick, I appreciate your diligence and guidance.

    crow
     

Share This Page