audition talk

Discussion in 'Orchestra / Solo / Chamber Music' started by PINT-O-MURPHY'S, Feb 4, 2005.

  1. PINT-O-MURPHY'S

    PINT-O-MURPHY'S New Friend

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    Feb 4, 2005
    hey TMers!! Let's get a little audition talk going. I know there are guys on here who are regularly advancing at auditions. What are some pointers you could give to those who are just getting started?
    What kinds of things are you working on? Let's get some info from Bob White and the Romemeister.
    Serve it up.
    peace
     
  2. robertwhite

    robertwhite Mezzo Piano User

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    Nov 11, 2003
    That's flattering, but since I still have a long way to go before I'm as qualified to dispense advice as Manny Laureano, I'll keep this short.

    My advice is - be honest about your shortcomings.

    I didn't figure out until I was 25 or so that I had to go back to square 1 and figure out how to operate the trumpet effectively. Since then, thanks to John Rommel, I feel like I can keep improving and gaining new skills.

    Auditions are so frustrating and dissapointing, I could never encourage anyone to start taking them unless they are absolutely convinced that they can play the trumpet at the level they want to. If you're a great musician but fold on your recitals - you're not ready yet. If you know every note of Mahler 5, including the 4th horn part, but can't play pianissimo without a Curry TF - you're not ready yet.

    I don't say this as an expert, but rather as someone who has to remind himself of these very facts time and time again. I was lucky enough to find a teacher with the guts to be honest and direct with me, but without discouraging me. Because of this, I feel like I keep improving and am excited to pursue my goals in spite of inevitable setbacks.

    Anyway, Tom Cupples is definitely the man. Congrats to him, and best wishes for success in DC!

    Best wishes,
    Bob
     
  3. romey1

    romey1 Banned

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    Oct 25, 2003
    Make sure you have the latest Monette C trumpet and that you have taken the appropriate amount of time to get used to it (after first consulting your acclimation guide of course)............

    :shock:

    romey
     
  4. Umyoguy

    Umyoguy New Friend

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    Feb 1, 2005
    Kalamazoo
    I hardly advance regularly, but I'm out there in the audition loop too.

    The best piece of advice I've gotten came from Dave Krauss. We were working on something in a lesson, and he said simply, "Jon, you have to wage war on your deficiencies."

    I'll never forget that.

    The thing about auditions is, you have to be 100% confident that you can nail anything that's on that list. You are not allowed to have any "weak spots" in your playing. Everything has to be there. It's not enough to have all but one of the excerpts nailed, and hope that the one you're not good at won't be asked. Everything has to be absolute nails, at the exact moment of the audition. And then, MAYBE, you'll advance.

    It's a cruel job, and a cruel business. And not that I know, but I'd like to think that the hard work will all have been worth it some day. To anyone not sure about whether it's the right line of work for them, IT'S NOT. Auditioning and playing in an orchestra is a compulsion. There's no choice involved. I couldn't imagine myself doing anything else. And I think a lot of the people on the circuit feel the same way.

    Now - Back to the woodshed.

    Jon
     
  5. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

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    Northern New York
    A bit earlier in the process...If you have not much recent experience, how do you go about getting it so you can get more? (See the round robin?) I was denied an audition a while back due to lack of experience (can't blame them; they want someone who doesn't have to learn. But, then again, it wasn't a major orchestra, either). How does one go about auditioning with such little experience? Can I contest the "thanks but no thanks" letter using references and get heard anyway? Would that be in vain?
     
  6. robertwhite

    robertwhite Mezzo Piano User

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    Nov 11, 2003
    trpter1,

    Almost everyone I know has been rejected from at least one audition. If there's no chance to send a tape, then your next approach is to follow up the rejection letter with a phone call to the personnel manager. Explain that you really want to be heard, and feel you are a good candidate for the job. Sometimes this won't work, but often it will.

    In certain cases, a reference can help, but I've never found it to work in my favor. Just be really insistent but polite, and you'll probably get to play.
     
  7. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

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    Jan 12, 2005
    Northern New York
    Robert- Thanks. I'll keep that one in mind. Might be something nearby opening sometime in the near future, I suspect.
     
  8. blutch

    blutch Pianissimo User

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    Dec 25, 2004
    Oklahoma City
    That's a good one. With my students I like to use: "Face your weaknesses with sword in hand!"

    The point is to go about overcoming your weaknesses in a systematic way and simply stop practicing what you can already do well. That's often hard for the ego to handle. Part of it is getting over worrying about who's listening to you practice. :-)

    MA
     
  9. Umyoguy

    Umyoguy New Friend

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    Feb 1, 2005
    Kalamazoo
    Sometimes the hard thing for me is just surrendering myself to the notion that if I keep working, day in and day out, that even if I can't see immediate improvement, that it will come. It gets to a point where even the smallest improvement takes months.

    It's fun though, when things finally solidify :)

    Jon
     
  10. tom turner

    tom turner Mezzo Forte User

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    Oct 25, 2003
    Georgia, USA
     

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